Scenes from last night’s Fall Out Boy show (photos) http://ift.tt/1wo7sDS Keith Urban may have had to call off tonight’s appearance at the Washington State Fair tonight, but emo-pop kings Fall Out Boy kept the grandstand party going Friday evening. Bassist and resident hearthrob Pete Wentz sported a new, blonde ‘do has the quartet ripped through a set that featured tracks from last year’s comeback album, “Save Rock and Roll,” along with “Dance, Dance,” “Sugar, We’re Going Down” and “This Ain’t a Scene, It’s An Arms Race,” among other fan favorites. Here’s some of what Tacoma Weekly freelancer Bill Bungard saw, with more photos available on his site, www.billbungard.com. September 13, 2014 at 04:48PM

Scenes from last night’s Fall Out Boy show (photos) http://ift.tt/1wo7sDS

Keith Urban may have had to call off tonight’s appearance at the Washington State Fair tonight, but emo-pop kings Fall Out Boy kept the grandstand party going Friday evening. Bassist and resident hearthrob Pete Wentz sported a new, blonde ‘do has the quartet ripped through a set that featured tracks from last year’s comeback album, “Save Rock and Roll,” along with “Dance, Dance,” “Sugar, We’re Going Down” and “This Ain’t a Scene, It’s An Arms Race,” among other fan favorites. Here’s some of what Tacoma Weekly freelancer Bill Bungard saw, with more photos available on his site, www.billbungard.com.

September 13, 2014 at 04:48PM

Scenes from last night’s Chicago, REO Speedwagon show at the Washington State Fair http://ift.tt/1wo7uM2 Veteran rock acts Chicago and REO Speedwagon took over the Washington State Fair grandstand Tuesday night, delivering some of their biggest hits during separate sets before teaming up to become one, giant super-group for the finale. Here’s what roving photographer Bill Bungard saw, in case you missed it, with more images available at www.billbungard.com.  September 10, 2014 at 02:08PM

Scenes from last night’s Chicago, REO Speedwagon show at the Washington State Fair http://ift.tt/1wo7uM2

Veteran rock acts Chicago and REO Speedwagon took over the Washington State Fair grandstand Tuesday night, delivering some of their biggest hits during separate sets before teaming up to become one, giant super-group for the finale. Here’s what roving photographer Bill Bungard saw, in case you missed it, with more images available at www.billbungard.com.

September 10, 2014 at 02:08PM

Arts & Entertainment: Local artists display work in Wright Park conservatory http://ift.tt/1tCwmh9 Wright Park’s W.W. Seymour Conservatory is currently the venue for a show of works by local artists entitled “Ethnobotany.” The show was curated by the dynamic Lisa Kinoshita, proprietor of Moss + Mineral design studio, renowned jewelry designer and artist and a recipient of the prestigious Greater Tacoma Community Foundation’s Foundation of Art Award.

The choice of the Seymour Conservatory as a venue yields mixed results for the art show. The lavish glass palace is home to a veritable jungle of exotic plants that overwhelm some of the artwork. Further, those artworks that are not lost in the foliage simply seem out of place more often than not.

Items that do blend with their surroundings without being overwhelmed are the ceramic sculptures of Melissa Balch whose semi-erotic works make incisive observations of human beings as an invasive species and of the corporate obsession with manipulation of the genetic code.

A hanging sculpture that blends well with the space is “Suspended Pod” by Sabrina Knowles and Jenny Pohlman. This piece is an elegant ornament made of numerous orbs of amber-colored glass. Look for it near the venerable lemon tree near the entrance of the conservatory.

A leaded glass and metal contraption called “Podsnappey” by Shannon Eakins and Marc Dombrosky utilizes the greenhouse setting to make a clever pun. The pair has constructed a glass replica of a landmine that is chained to one of the plants. Should that plant experience a growth spurt, the land mine would spew the seeds of invasive species hither and yon. 

Doug Johnston’s “Rumpleskillskid,” a kind or burka made of rope (humorously called a “wearable hut”), might be better appreciated in a less distracting setting. The same is true for Jeremy Gregory’s delightful collection of figurines: a group of moonshiners with their jugs of hooch caught in the act of playing music on their rustic instruments. The dude with the washboard is laid out on the leaf of one of the conservatory’s gigantic succulents.

Steve Jensen’s carved wooden column blends so well with the greenhouse jungle that it is almost unnoticeable. The same can be said of Barbara De Pirro’s “Spanish Moss,” an entanglement of shredded plastic made from old milk jugs. Here the description of the artwork is more interesting than the artwork itself.

Glass artist Benjamin Cobb, who has done much with the Museum of Glass, has created two glass panels with abstract designs that are supposed to be enlargements of glass slides used with microscopes. Mounted in front of a white board and set behind the koi pond, these feel very out of place. Unfortunately Kinoshita’s own contribution to the show, an installation called “Forward Motion,” also has an awkward relationship to the space. There is a car tire, a mirrored pedestal, spray-painted boxes and a baby rubber plant. Kinoshita is making an observation on the key role of the rubber plant in the industrial revolution, colonialism and climate change. It is an interesting topic, but Kinoshita’s hodge-podge assemblage is too loosey-goosey to make the point without the aid of the note card. Otherwise it is too perplexing and even off-putting. (Sorry, Lisa.)

“Ethnobotany” runs through Oct. 12. For further information visit http://ift.tt/1pTqFYB. September 10, 2014 at 01:37PM

Arts & Entertainment: Local artists display work in Wright Park conservatory http://ift.tt/1tCwmh9

Wright Park’s W.W. Seymour Conservatory is currently the venue for a show of works by local artists entitled “Ethnobotany.” The show was curated by the dynamic Lisa Kinoshita, proprietor of Moss + Mineral design studio, renowned jewelry designer and artist and a recipient of the prestigious Greater Tacoma Community Foundation’s Foundation of Art Award.

The choice of the Seymour Conservatory as a venue yields mixed results for the art show. The lavish glass palace is home to a veritable jungle of exotic plants that overwhelm some of the artwork. Further, those artworks that are not lost in the foliage simply seem out of place more often than not.

Items that do blend with their surroundings without being overwhelmed are the ceramic sculptures of Melissa Balch whose semi-erotic works make incisive observations of human beings as an invasive species and of the corporate obsession with manipulation of the genetic code.

A hanging sculpture that blends well with the space is “Suspended Pod” by Sabrina Knowles and Jenny Pohlman. This piece is an elegant ornament made of numerous orbs of amber-colored glass. Look for it near the venerable lemon tree near the entrance of the conservatory.

A leaded glass and metal contraption called “Podsnappey” by Shannon Eakins and Marc Dombrosky utilizes the greenhouse setting to make a clever pun. The pair has constructed a glass replica of a landmine that is chained to one of the plants. Should that plant experience a growth spurt, the land mine would spew the seeds of invasive species hither and yon.

Doug Johnston’s “Rumpleskillskid,” a kind or burka made of rope (humorously called a “wearable hut”), might be better appreciated in a less distracting setting. The same is true for Jeremy Gregory’s delightful collection of figurines: a group of moonshiners with their jugs of hooch caught in the act of playing music on their rustic instruments. The dude with the washboard is laid out on the leaf of one of the conservatory’s gigantic succulents.

Steve Jensen’s carved wooden column blends so well with the greenhouse jungle that it is almost unnoticeable. The same can be said of Barbara De Pirro’s “Spanish Moss,” an entanglement of shredded plastic made from old milk jugs. Here the description of the artwork is more interesting than the artwork itself.

Glass artist Benjamin Cobb, who has done much with the Museum of Glass, has created two glass panels with abstract designs that are supposed to be enlargements of glass slides used with microscopes. Mounted in front of a white board and set behind the koi pond, these feel very out of place. Unfortunately Kinoshita’s own contribution to the show, an installation called “Forward Motion,” also has an awkward relationship to the space. There is a car tire, a mirrored pedestal, spray-painted boxes and a baby rubber plant. Kinoshita is making an observation on the key role of the rubber plant in the industrial revolution, colonialism and climate change. It is an interesting topic, but Kinoshita’s hodge-podge assemblage is too loosey-goosey to make the point without the aid of the note card. Otherwise it is too perplexing and even off-putting. (Sorry, Lisa.)

“Ethnobotany” runs through Oct. 12. For further information visit http://ift.tt/1pTqFYB.

September 10, 2014 at 01:37PM

Make a Scene: Picker Forest Beutel unleashes solo album http://ift.tt/1xP23ui If you’ve checked out more than a couple of bluegrass shows in Tacoma, chances are you’ll recognize Forest Beutel, who plays banjo for Barleywine Revue and the Rusty Cleavers, two of the area’s most popular bands in the genre. 

But, on Sept. 19, fans will get to see another side of Beutel who will unleash his new solo album, “If You Label Me, You Negate Me,” with an all-ages show at 8 p.m. on Sept. 19 at B Sharp Coffehouse. The venue is located at 706 Opera Alley in Tacoma. The $5 cover charge includes a copy of the album.

In anticipation, we caught up to talk about his new record, his punk rock roots and to make a goofy suggestion based on his distinctive look. 

Tacoma Weekly: I don’t know if anyone has told you, but you bear a striking resemblance to James Hetfield. Have you ever thought about starting a Metallica tribute band?

Beutel: I never have thought of doing that, but I have been likened to James Hetfield several times. I much prefer James Hetfield to Dog the Bounty Hunter. 

TW: Do people say that, too? Maybe Dog gives you more street cred. 

Beutel: Well, these days. But maybe back in the ’80s James Hetfield would have given me more cred. But he cut is his hair, so …

TW: But seriously, how did you get involved in the local music scene?

Beutel: I moved out here when I was 23. I spent my first 23 years in Rhode Island, and I played in a couple of punk bands on the East Coast. We did a lot of touring and put out a few records with those bands. After doing that for five or six years, I just needed a change; and, for whatever reason, the Pacific Northwest was calling my name. 

TW: So you picked up and headed west, like people have been doing for a couple of centuries. 

Beutel: Yeah, looking for that proverbial gold.

TW: But how did you wind up joining two popular bluegrass bands from around here?

Beutel: When I moved out here, I had my Toyota Camry and my drums didn’t fit. My grandpa gave me his banjo before he passed away, so I just took that with me. I had it and I was just kind of plunkin’ around on it. Then my friend, Kevin (Shintaku), who started Barleywine Revue (asked) “Hey, I’m starting this bluegrass band.” I was like, “I can’t play the thing, but I’ll join.” Then we started playing around, playing college parties and little bar gigs here and there. 

TW: But now you’ve got solo material. Bring me up to speed. 

Beutel: I’ve been working on this album how for almost a year, just recording and mixing and then working with my graphic designer to get everything together. I’m playing the banjo with my hands and I have the bass drum and hi-hat going with each of my feet. I play the harmonica, too, and I sing, so there’s a lot going on. I try to keep it as interesting as possible for the listeners. It’s a mix of high-energy tunes and then some more down-tempo blues kind of stuff. 

TW: Compare and contrast what you’re doing with your solo stuff versus the “drunk-grass” stuff you do with Barleywine and Rusty Cleavers. 

Beutel: My solo stuff is not very bluegrassy at all. It’s kind of hard to put a label on it. That’s part of where the name of the album comes from. I guess you call it Americana-blues? A lot of it is not as high energy as the Rusty Cleavers or Barleywine. A lot of it’s kind of more centered around the lyrics. I guess you could call it more introspective, definitely. 

TW: Where did you make the new CD, and who did you work with? 

Beutel: The sound engineer I worked with is named Ryan Rood, and we recorded at Elk and Boar Studios (run by local band Elk and Boar.)

TW: I was going to ask if your other bands were on hold for a while, but I see they have another gig coming up next week at Doyle’s. 

Beutel: Cleavers are at Doyle’s on the 17th (at 9:30 p.m.). Barleywine is taking the month of September off just ‘cause we toured down to California in August, and we worked pretty hard this summer. But Cleavers are still pretty busy. The summer was crazy busy, so September doesn’t feel so busy, and I think October slows down quite a bit, too. September 10, 2014 at 09:30AM

Make a Scene: Picker Forest Beutel unleashes solo album http://ift.tt/1xP23ui

If you’ve checked out more than a couple of bluegrass shows in Tacoma, chances are you’ll recognize Forest Beutel, who plays banjo for Barleywine Revue and the Rusty Cleavers, two of the area’s most popular bands in the genre.

But, on Sept. 19, fans will get to see another side of Beutel who will unleash his new solo album, “If You Label Me, You Negate Me,” with an all-ages show at 8 p.m. on Sept. 19 at B Sharp Coffehouse. The venue is located at 706 Opera Alley in Tacoma. The $5 cover charge includes a copy of the album.

In anticipation, we caught up to talk about his new record, his punk rock roots and to make a goofy suggestion based on his distinctive look.

Tacoma Weekly: I don’t know if anyone has told you, but you bear a striking resemblance to James Hetfield. Have you ever thought about starting a Metallica tribute band?

Beutel: I never have thought of doing that, but I have been likened to James Hetfield several times. I much prefer James Hetfield to Dog the Bounty Hunter.

TW: Do people say that, too? Maybe Dog gives you more street cred.

Beutel: Well, these days. But maybe back in the ’80s James Hetfield would have given me more cred. But he cut is his hair, so …

TW: But seriously, how did you get involved in the local music scene?

Beutel: I moved out here when I was 23. I spent my first 23 years in Rhode Island, and I played in a couple of punk bands on the East Coast. We did a lot of touring and put out a few records with those bands. After doing that for five or six years, I just needed a change; and, for whatever reason, the Pacific Northwest was calling my name.

TW: So you picked up and headed west, like people have been doing for a couple of centuries.

Beutel: Yeah, looking for that proverbial gold.

TW: But how did you wind up joining two popular bluegrass bands from around here?

Beutel: When I moved out here, I had my Toyota Camry and my drums didn’t fit. My grandpa gave me his banjo before he passed away, so I just took that with me. I had it and I was just kind of plunkin’ around on it. Then my friend, Kevin (Shintaku), who started Barleywine Revue (asked) “Hey, I’m starting this bluegrass band.” I was like, “I can’t play the thing, but I’ll join.” Then we started playing around, playing college parties and little bar gigs here and there.

TW: But now you’ve got solo material. Bring me up to speed.

Beutel: I’ve been working on this album how for almost a year, just recording and mixing and then working with my graphic designer to get everything together. I’m playing the banjo with my hands and I have the bass drum and hi-hat going with each of my feet. I play the harmonica, too, and I sing, so there’s a lot going on. I try to keep it as interesting as possible for the listeners. It’s a mix of high-energy tunes and then some more down-tempo blues kind of stuff.

TW: Compare and contrast what you’re doing with your solo stuff versus the “drunk-grass” stuff you do with Barleywine and Rusty Cleavers.

Beutel: My solo stuff is not very bluegrassy at all. It’s kind of hard to put a label on it. That’s part of where the name of the album comes from. I guess you call it Americana-blues? A lot of it is not as high energy as the Rusty Cleavers or Barleywine. A lot of it’s kind of more centered around the lyrics. I guess you could call it more introspective, definitely.

TW: Where did you make the new CD, and who did you work with?

Beutel: The sound engineer I worked with is named Ryan Rood, and we recorded at Elk and Boar Studios (run by local band Elk and Boar.)

TW: I was going to ask if your other bands were on hold for a while, but I see they have another gig coming up next week at Doyle’s.

Beutel: Cleavers are at Doyle’s on the 17th (at 9:30 p.m.). Barleywine is taking the month of September off just ‘cause we toured down to California in August, and we worked pretty hard this summer. But Cleavers are still pretty busy. The summer was crazy busy, so September doesn’t feel so busy, and I think October slows down quite a bit, too.

September 10, 2014 at 09:30AM

Jazz LIVE at Marine View launches hot new season http://ift.tt/1xP22X7 After taking the summer off, Jazz LIVE at Marine View is ready to kick off its fall season this weekend. The series presents free jazz show once a month at Marine View Presbyterian Church, 8469 Eastside Dr. NE, in Tacoma. Here is the new schedule: 

The Mark Lewis Quartet featuring Milo Petersen (5 p.m., Sept. 14): Saxophone and flute master Mark Lewis was born in Tacoma and studied music at Western Washington University and Cornish College of the Arts before moving away to Europe where he played many of the top clubs and jazz festivals. He also lived in San Francisco and recorded a top 40 jazz album after auditioning for Stan Getz to land a record deal. He is a prolific composer, with more than 1,600 songs to his name; http://ift.tt/1tCwgpK.

Dmitri Matheny (5 p.m., Oct. 12): The Bay Area-based Matheny is a composer, educator, producer and recording artist who the San Jose Mercury News hails as “the first breakthrough flugelhornist since Chuck Mangione.” He leads the Dmitry Matheny Group, a collection of all-star players from around the West; http://ift.tt/1xP22Xh. 

Entre Mundos Quarteto (5 p.m., Nov. 16): This energetic, Seattle-based, Brazilian ensemble features vocalist Adriana Giordano, pianist Eric Verlinde, bassist Dean Schmidt and drummer Jeff Busch. Sample the band’s music online at http://ift.tt/1tCwihv. 

The sixth annual Michael Powers Holiday Jazz show (5 p.m., Dec. 14): “It’s hard to categorize my music, although it usually ends up in the Jazz record bins,” the Seattle jazz guitarist says. “If I had to put a label on it, I would call it contemporary instrumental music. It’s a sound rooted in the Jazz tradition that keeps pace stylistically with Pop, R&B, and Blues; with Blues being at the core of my inspiration.” Powers has been playing in support of his new “Passport” CD, which you can learn more about at http://ift.tt/1xP23dy. 

Learn more about the Jazz Live at Marine View series by calling (253) 927-0557 or visiting http://ift.tt/17569vK. September 10, 2014 at 09:27AM

Jazz LIVE at Marine View launches hot new season http://ift.tt/1xP22X7

After taking the summer off, Jazz LIVE at Marine View is ready to kick off its fall season this weekend. The series presents free jazz show once a month at Marine View Presbyterian Church, 8469 Eastside Dr. NE, in Tacoma. Here is the new schedule:

The Mark Lewis Quartet featuring Milo Petersen (5 p.m., Sept. 14): Saxophone and flute master Mark Lewis was born in Tacoma and studied music at Western Washington University and Cornish College of the Arts before moving away to Europe where he played many of the top clubs and jazz festivals. He also lived in San Francisco and recorded a top 40 jazz album after auditioning for Stan Getz to land a record deal. He is a prolific composer, with more than 1,600 songs to his name; http://ift.tt/1tCwgpK.

Dmitri Matheny (5 p.m., Oct. 12): The Bay Area-based Matheny is a composer, educator, producer and recording artist who the San Jose Mercury News hails as “the first breakthrough flugelhornist since Chuck Mangione.” He leads the Dmitry Matheny Group, a collection of all-star players from around the West; http://ift.tt/1xP22Xh.

Entre Mundos Quarteto (5 p.m., Nov. 16): This energetic, Seattle-based, Brazilian ensemble features vocalist Adriana Giordano, pianist Eric Verlinde, bassist Dean Schmidt and drummer Jeff Busch. Sample the band’s music online at http://ift.tt/1tCwihv.

The sixth annual Michael Powers Holiday Jazz show (5 p.m., Dec. 14): “It’s hard to categorize my music, although it usually ends up in the Jazz record bins,” the Seattle jazz guitarist says. “If I had to put a label on it, I would call it contemporary instrumental music. It’s a sound rooted in the Jazz tradition that keeps pace stylistically with Pop, R&B, and Blues; with Blues being at the core of my inspiration.” Powers has been playing in support of his new “Passport” CD, which you can learn more about at http://ift.tt/1xP23dy.

Learn more about the Jazz Live at Marine View series by calling (253) 927-0557 or visiting http://ift.tt/17569vK.

September 10, 2014 at 09:27AM

Tacoma Gears up for annual Maritime Fest http://ift.tt/1xP20hT The summer season is once again being sent off with the annual Tacoma Maritime Fest on Sept 20 and 21 at the Foss Waterway Seaport Museum and Thea Foss Park from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Maritime Fest is an annual tradition full of vendors and boats for Tacomans to explore over a weekend. Festival Manager Sue Schaeffer’s primary goal has been to put together a festival that celebrates every part of the waterfront.

“Tacoma is so rich in maritime history, I feel like we’re missing the boat by not celebrating all the aspects of that history,” she said. “We really have gotten away from that street fair feel – it’s not generic and it’s really drilling down to the theme.”

Maritime Fest will host 40 vendors, most of which will have ties to the waterfront.

“I feel good about the fact that it’s richer, more appropriate type of vendors for this type of festival,” Schaeffer said

Schaeffer has put an emphasis on art at Maritime Fest this year, scoring a grant from the city allowing the fest to launch three different art initiatives. The first will allow youth to help paint a shipping container donated by Northwest Containers. A mural will be drawn on the container, and children will be directed to fill in the spots they can reach, completing a picture of the waterfront.

The second initiative involves older children using found art (logs, seaweed, shells) to create new pieces of art. The final initiative involves 12 different artists painting boats no bigger than three-feet wide. All of this art will be on display at the monthly Art Walk and all help paint a bigger picture of what the Tacoma waterfront represents.

All this art will be topped off by the dedication of the new Murray Morgan Bridge Mural, “The Hands that Built Tacoma,” on Saturday, Sept. 21 from 3-3:30 p.m. The mural, painted by artist Nick Goettling, is located under the west side of the bridge and shows the waterfront at its finest.

“It’s beautiful; it really depicts the working waterfront,” Schaeffer said.

Of course, the fest would not be complete without loads and loads of boats, and this year is no exception. The port will be full of everything from tugs to sail boats for viewers to check out at no charge. 

“The port is a huge economic engine in our city, and I think everybody knows that the trades are suffering – the professions are not passing along. Kids are not following their dads into the trade, and we have to focus on it, it being such a huge supporter of our economy. We have to make sure those trades flourish. Maritime Fest is a good way to do that,” Schaeffer said.

Maritime Fest will also feature live music throughout both days from Tacoma staples like Kim Archer and indie rockers Battersea.

Also present at the fest will be the annual Quick and Dirty boat building competition in which 10 teams of three people will be given the same materials and six hours to build a boat, which will then be raced in the Thea Foss Waterway. The Sea Scouts non-profit group will offer festival-goers rides on their training sailboats on a first come-first served basis, giving Tacomans an up close view of how important the waterfront can be.

“We want to make this a celebration of not just the working waterfront but everything about the waterfront, to get kids excited for everything from kayaks to tugs. We have to get kids interested in the waterfront or else they won’t protect it,” Schaeffer said.

This excitement is cultivated by hundreds of volunteers and sponsors that help put the Maritime Fest together every year.

“We’re really grateful to volunteers, partners and sponsors. Putting this together would be impossible without them,” Schaeffer said.

For more information on Maritime Fest, visit http://ift.tt/15Rc3SI. September 10, 2014 at 09:24AM

Tacoma Gears up for annual Maritime Fest http://ift.tt/1xP20hT

The summer season is once again being sent off with the annual Tacoma Maritime Fest on Sept 20 and 21 at the Foss Waterway Seaport Museum and Thea Foss Park from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Maritime Fest is an annual tradition full of vendors and boats for Tacomans to explore over a weekend. Festival Manager Sue Schaeffer’s primary goal has been to put together a festival that celebrates every part of the waterfront.

“Tacoma is so rich in maritime history, I feel like we’re missing the boat by not celebrating all the aspects of that history,” she said. “We really have gotten away from that street fair feel – it’s not generic and it’s really drilling down to the theme.”

Maritime Fest will host 40 vendors, most of which will have ties to the waterfront.

“I feel good about the fact that it’s richer, more appropriate type of vendors for this type of festival,” Schaeffer said

Schaeffer has put an emphasis on art at Maritime Fest this year, scoring a grant from the city allowing the fest to launch three different art initiatives. The first will allow youth to help paint a shipping container donated by Northwest Containers. A mural will be drawn on the container, and children will be directed to fill in the spots they can reach, completing a picture of the waterfront.

The second initiative involves older children using found art (logs, seaweed, shells) to create new pieces of art. The final initiative involves 12 different artists painting boats no bigger than three-feet wide. All of this art will be on display at the monthly Art Walk and all help paint a bigger picture of what the Tacoma waterfront represents.

All this art will be topped off by the dedication of the new Murray Morgan Bridge Mural, “The Hands that Built Tacoma,” on Saturday, Sept. 21 from 3-3:30 p.m. The mural, painted by artist Nick Goettling, is located under the west side of the bridge and shows the waterfront at its finest.

“It’s beautiful; it really depicts the working waterfront,” Schaeffer said.

Of course, the fest would not be complete without loads and loads of boats, and this year is no exception. The port will be full of everything from tugs to sail boats for viewers to check out at no charge.

“The port is a huge economic engine in our city, and I think everybody knows that the trades are suffering – the professions are not passing along. Kids are not following their dads into the trade, and we have to focus on it, it being such a huge supporter of our economy. We have to make sure those trades flourish. Maritime Fest is a good way to do that,” Schaeffer said.

Maritime Fest will also feature live music throughout both days from Tacoma staples like Kim Archer and indie rockers Battersea.

Also present at the fest will be the annual Quick and Dirty boat building competition in which 10 teams of three people will be given the same materials and six hours to build a boat, which will then be raced in the Thea Foss Waterway. The Sea Scouts non-profit group will offer festival-goers rides on their training sailboats on a first come-first served basis, giving Tacomans an up close view of how important the waterfront can be.

“We want to make this a celebration of not just the working waterfront but everything about the waterfront, to get kids excited for everything from kayaks to tugs. We have to get kids interested in the waterfront or else they won’t protect it,” Schaeffer said.

This excitement is cultivated by hundreds of volunteers and sponsors that help put the Maritime Fest together every year.

“We’re really grateful to volunteers, partners and sponsors. Putting this together would be impossible without them,” Schaeffer said.

For more information on Maritime Fest, visit http://ift.tt/15Rc3SI.

September 10, 2014 at 09:24AM

Arts & Entertainment: Jennifer Nettles goes pop at the fair http://ift.tt/1tCwfCc Chart-topping country act Sugarland has been on hiatus for a few years, but the duo hasn’t exactly left local fans hanging this summer. Its less vocal half, Kristian Bush, dropped by Joint Base Lewis-McChord on the Fourth of July to preview material from his forthcoming solo project; and, on Monday, Sept. 8, it was his sassy band mate Jennifer Nettles’ turn as she headlined the Washington State Fair grandstand with songs from her own solo disc, “That Girl.” 

That album – produced by pop hit-maker Rick Rubin – topped the Billboard Country Album chart back in January, with Nettles channeling her various country, gospel, R&B and ’70s soft-rock influences into a more expansive pop sound. More than 4,000 fans showed up to catch one of pop’s most likeable divas perform her new repertoire in Puyallup.

The singer and her four-piece band got things started with the new album’s title track and, from the start, the fullness and versatility of Nettles’ expressive vibrato were on full display. She could pour on a little extra twang, as she did for “Baby Girl,” the first Sugarland hit to show up on the set list. But she also hinted at her potential as a full-blown gospel or soul singer, her voice soaring on numbers like “Me Without You” and “This One’s for You.” 

Nettles really let loose sitting at a piano and breaking into vocal histrionics toward the end of Ambrosia’s groovy 1980 classic, “Biggest Part of Me.” “I was this close to taking it to Mariah Carey level, but I kept it down here,” she joked. 

That last one was among a few inventive covers Nettles added to her set, which also included a stripped down version of Imagine Dragons’ “Demons,” a snippet of Iggy Azalea’s omnipresent “Fancy” (snuck into Sugarland hit “Something More”) and Bob Seger & The Silver Bullet Band’s “Like a Rock,” her final selection of the evening. But fans responded loudest every time she and her band launched into one of the Sugarland hits, also “All I Want to Do” and the duo’s lilting ballad, “Stay.” 

If there was a knock on Nettles’ performance, it was that she stayed in mid-tempo mode almost the entire time. The ballads were a nice change of pace, especially her heartfelt delivery of “Thank You,” a love letter to her fans. But she hadn’t really “rocked” much by the time her band turned it up a few notches in the 11th hour with her funny riff on online gossip, “Know You Wanna Know.” 

It was a homecoming show for opener Brandy Clark, who joined Nettles onstage for their duet “His Hands” and opened with stripped down, acoustic versions of material from her debut album, “12 Stories.” “I grew up not far from here,” the Morton native announced after kicking things off with her band girls’ anthem, “Crazy Women.” 

The singer-songwriter was accompanied by one other guitarist, and the simple arrangements helped emphasize the clever songwriting that’s made her a hot commodity in Nashville. Among her 30-minute set’s highlights were “Mama’s Broken Heart,” a hit she co-wrote for Miranda Lambert, “Stripes” and “Get High,” which she said she wrote with a particular Morgan High School classmate in mind. 

“I wrote that long before pot was legal anywhere,” she added. “It doesn’t have the same punch it used to have.” 

Clark is on a roll, and don’t be surprised if you see her headlining the grandstand with a full band behind her next year. 

Set list: “That Girl,” “Moneyball,” “Baby Girl” (Sugarland), “Me Without You,” “Falling,” “Biggest Part of Me” (Ambrosia), “This One’s For You,” “Jealousy,” “This Angel,” “All I Want to Do” (Sugarland), “Good Time to Cry,” “Demons” (Imagine Dragons), “Something More” (Sugarland, with elements of Iggy Azalea’s “Fancy”), “His Hands” (with opener Brandy Clark), “Stay” (Sugarland), “Know You Wanna Know,” “Thank You,” “Like a Rock” (Bob Seger remake) September 10, 2014 at 08:45AM

Arts & Entertainment: Jennifer Nettles goes pop at the fair http://ift.tt/1tCwfCc

Chart-topping country act Sugarland has been on hiatus for a few years, but the duo hasn’t exactly left local fans hanging this summer. Its less vocal half, Kristian Bush, dropped by Joint Base Lewis-McChord on the Fourth of July to preview material from his forthcoming solo project; and, on Monday, Sept. 8, it was his sassy band mate Jennifer Nettles’ turn as she headlined the Washington State Fair grandstand with songs from her own solo disc, “That Girl.”

That album – produced by pop hit-maker Rick Rubin – topped the Billboard Country Album chart back in January, with Nettles channeling her various country, gospel, R&B and ’70s soft-rock influences into a more expansive pop sound. More than 4,000 fans showed up to catch one of pop’s most likeable divas perform her new repertoire in Puyallup.

The singer and her four-piece band got things started with the new album’s title track and, from the start, the fullness and versatility of Nettles’ expressive vibrato were on full display. She could pour on a little extra twang, as she did for “Baby Girl,” the first Sugarland hit to show up on the set list. But she also hinted at her potential as a full-blown gospel or soul singer, her voice soaring on numbers like “Me Without You” and “This One’s for You.”

Nettles really let loose sitting at a piano and breaking into vocal histrionics toward the end of Ambrosia’s groovy 1980 classic, “Biggest Part of Me.” “I was this close to taking it to Mariah Carey level, but I kept it down here,” she joked.

That last one was among a few inventive covers Nettles added to her set, which also included a stripped down version of Imagine Dragons’ “Demons,” a snippet of Iggy Azalea’s omnipresent “Fancy” (snuck into Sugarland hit “Something More”) and Bob Seger & The Silver Bullet Band’s “Like a Rock,” her final selection of the evening. But fans responded loudest every time she and her band launched into one of the Sugarland hits, also “All I Want to Do” and the duo’s lilting ballad, “Stay.”

If there was a knock on Nettles’ performance, it was that she stayed in mid-tempo mode almost the entire time. The ballads were a nice change of pace, especially her heartfelt delivery of “Thank You,” a love letter to her fans. But she hadn’t really “rocked” much by the time her band turned it up a few notches in the 11th hour with her funny riff on online gossip, “Know You Wanna Know.”

It was a homecoming show for opener Brandy Clark, who joined Nettles onstage for their duet “His Hands” and opened with stripped down, acoustic versions of material from her debut album, “12 Stories.” “I grew up not far from here,” the Morton native announced after kicking things off with her band girls’ anthem, “Crazy Women.”

The singer-songwriter was accompanied by one other guitarist, and the simple arrangements helped emphasize the clever songwriting that’s made her a hot commodity in Nashville. Among her 30-minute set’s highlights were “Mama’s Broken Heart,” a hit she co-wrote for Miranda Lambert, “Stripes” and “Get High,” which she said she wrote with a particular Morgan High School classmate in mind.

“I wrote that long before pot was legal anywhere,” she added. “It doesn’t have the same punch it used to have.”

Clark is on a roll, and don’t be surprised if you see her headlining the grandstand with a full band behind her next year.

Set list: “That Girl,” “Moneyball,” “Baby Girl” (Sugarland), “Me Without You,” “Falling,” “Biggest Part of Me” (Ambrosia), “This One’s For You,” “Jealousy,” “This Angel,” “All I Want to Do” (Sugarland), “Good Time to Cry,” “Demons” (Imagine Dragons), “Something More” (Sugarland, with elements of Iggy Azalea’s “Fancy”), “His Hands” (with opener Brandy Clark), “Stay” (Sugarland), “Know You Wanna Know,” “Thank You,” “Like a Rock” (Bob Seger remake)

September 10, 2014 at 08:45AM

Arts & Entertainment: All hail Storm Large http://ift.tt/1xP1WPl Storm Large and her Portland-based band opened Broadway Center’s season Sept. 4, with an intimate set at Theatre on the Square. Her voice was powerful yet sultry as she delivered such original, fan favorites as “8 Miles Wide” and edgy covers of material by Black Sabbath, Olivia Newton John, Tom Waits and more. Her solid, new backing band, Le Bonheur – featured on her forthcoming new album of the same name – included James Beaton on piano, Scott Weddle on guitar and Greg Eklund on drums. 

Large is best known nationally for appearing on the reality TV show “Rock Star: Super Nova” in 2006 and regionally for crafting a punk-infused lounge act that showcases her vocal and comedic prowess. Her filthy stage banter kept the crowd in stitches; and, during a more touching moment, she paid tribute to comedy legend Joan Rivers who had passed away earlier that day, speaking about how Rivers paved the way for her brand of humor.

Large also made passing reference to former Pink Martini band mate Derek Rieth, who recently committed suicide. She brought a nude painting of herself onstage that had been given to her by a fan before the show, noting a man that lurked in one corner of the image. “It kind of looks like Derek,” she said, alluding to the struggles that led to his demise. “He will always be in my heart.” 

Visit http://ift.tt/15Rcblq to find more images from the show. 

Set list: Under My Skin, It’s Alright, Boom-Boom, I Want You, Stay With Me, Saving All My Love, NIB, Angels, Woman’s Heart, Inside Outside, Maybe This Time, Ne Me Quitte Pas, Hopeless, Call Me Crazy, 8 Miles Wide, Pixies, Total Eclipse, Stand Up For Me September 09, 2014 at 09:47AM

Arts & Entertainment: All hail Storm Large http://ift.tt/1xP1WPl

Storm Large and her Portland-based band opened Broadway Center’s season Sept. 4, with an intimate set at Theatre on the Square. Her voice was powerful yet sultry as she delivered such original, fan favorites as “8 Miles Wide” and edgy covers of material by Black Sabbath, Olivia Newton John, Tom Waits and more. Her solid, new backing band, Le Bonheur – featured on her forthcoming new album of the same name – included James Beaton on piano, Scott Weddle on guitar and Greg Eklund on drums.

Large is best known nationally for appearing on the reality TV show “Rock Star: Super Nova” in 2006 and regionally for crafting a punk-infused lounge act that showcases her vocal and comedic prowess. Her filthy stage banter kept the crowd in stitches; and, during a more touching moment, she paid tribute to comedy legend Joan Rivers who had passed away earlier that day, speaking about how Rivers paved the way for her brand of humor.

Large also made passing reference to former Pink Martini band mate Derek Rieth, who recently committed suicide. She brought a nude painting of herself onstage that had been given to her by a fan before the show, noting a man that lurked in one corner of the image. “It kind of looks like Derek,” she said, alluding to the struggles that led to his demise. “He will always be in my heart.”

Visit http://ift.tt/15Rcblq to find more images from the show.

Set list: Under My Skin, It’s Alright, Boom-Boom, I Want You, Stay With Me, Saving All My Love, NIB, Angels, Woman’s Heart, Inside Outside, Maybe This Time, Ne Me Quitte Pas, Hopeless, Call Me Crazy, 8 Miles Wide, Pixies, Total Eclipse, Stand Up For Me

September 09, 2014 at 09:47AM

Nightlife http://ift.tt/1tCweOR Friday, Sept. 12

WASHINGTON STATE FAIR: Fall Out Boy, New Politics (pop-punk, emo) 7:30 p.m., $45-$55, AA

B SHARP COFFEE: Patti Allen (R&B, blues) 8 p.m., NC, AA

GREAT AMERICAN CASINO: Le Quyen (Vietnamese pop) 9 p.m., NC

HALF PINT: Velocity (rock) 9 p.m., NC

JAZZBONES: The Kirby Sewell Band (R&B, blues) 8 p.m., $15

KEYS ON MAIN: Dueling pianos, 9 p.m., NC

LOUIE G’S: Lady Justice, Jason Kertson & The Immortals, The Thrill (rock) 5 p.m., AA

MAXWELL’S: Lance Buller Trio (jazz) 7 p.m., NC

THE SWISS: Mr. Pink (dance) 9 p.m., $5-$10

TACOMA COMEDY: Ian Karmel (comedy) 8, 10:30 p.m., $15

UNCLE SAM’S: Taco Ninjas (metal) 9 p.m.

Saturday, Sept. 13

EMERALD QUEEN: Anthony Hamilton (soul, R&B) 8:30 p.m., $45-$100

B SHARP COFFEE: Jeff Ross Trio (pop, acoustic, folk) 8 p.m., NC, AA

BOB’S JAVA JIVE: Dionvox (darkwave, glo-fi) 8 p.m., AA

CHENEY STADIUM: Moveable Feast featuring Stephanie Anne Johnson, Seattle Rock Orchestra, The Tennants, Rusty Cleavers and more (eclectic) 4 and 6 p.m., NC, AA

GREAT AMERICAN CASINO: Sonic Funk Orchestra (dance) 9 p.m., NC

HALF PINT: Speakerbox (hip-hop) 9 p.m., AA

KEYS ON MAIN: Dueling pianos, 9 p.m., NC

LOUIE G’S: Amanda Hardy, Boneshaker, Darklight, Stolen Society (metal, hard rock) 8 p.m., AA

THE SPAR: Stonepony (rock) 8 p.m., NC

THE SWISS: The Spazmatics (’80s covers) 9 p.m., $5-$10

TACOMA COMEDY: Ian Karmel (comedy) 8, 10:30 p.m., $15

TACOMA DOME: Katy Perry, Tegan and Sara, Ferras (pop) 7:30 p.m., $40.50-$100.50, AA

WASHINGTON STATE FAIR: Keith Urban (country) 7:30 p.m., $40-$100, AA

Sunday, Sept. 14

WASHINGTON STATE FAIR: Teen Hoot (pop) 1 p.m., $20-$25, AA; Vicente Fernandez, Jr., Antonio Aguilar, Mariachi Azteca (Mexican pop) 7:30 p.m., $20-$27.50, AA

DAWSON’S: Tim Hall Band (open jam) 8 p.m., NC

NEW FRONTIER: 40 Grit (bluegrass jam) 3 p.m., NC

THE SPAR: Mark Dufresne (blues) 7 p.m., NC

TACOMA COMEDY: Stand-Up Truth or Dare (comedy) 8 p.m., $10, 18+

Monday, Sept. 15

THE SWISS: Hook Me Up (jazz) 9 p.m., NC

GIG SPOT: Monday Mash-Up open mic and trivia, 8 p.m., NC, AA

JAZZBONES: Rockaroke (live band karaoke) 11 p.m., NC

NEW FRONTIER: Open mic comedy, 9 p.m., NC

WASHINGTON STATE FAIR: Florida Georgia Line, Dallas Smith (country) 7:30 p.m., $40-$90, AA

Tuesday, Sept. 16

WASHINGTON STATE FAIR: Lindsey Stirling (violin, pop, EDM) 7:30 p.m., $20-$35, AA

ANTIQUE SANDWICH CO.: Open mic, 6:30 p.m., $3, AA

DAVE’S OF MILTON: Jerry Miller (blues, rock) 7 p.m., NC

JAZZBONES: Ha Ha Tuesday with host Ralph Porter (comedy) 8:30 p.m., $5

NEW FRONTIER: Open mic, 7 p.m., NC

STONEGATE: Leanne Trevalyan (acoustic open mic) 8 p.m., NC

Wednesday, Sept. 17

DAWSON’S: Linda Myers Band (open jam) 8 p.m., NC

JAZZBONES: Giant Panda Guerilla Dub Squad, Easy Star All-Stars (dub reggae) 8 p.m., $25

STONEGATE: Dave Nichols’ Hump Day Jam, 8:30 p.m., NC

TACOMA COMEDY: Comedy open mic, 8 p.m., NC, 18+

TOWER BAR & GRILL: Michelle Beaudry (jazz guitar) 4:30 p.m.

WASHINGTON STATE FAIR: Michael W. Smith, Amy Grant (Christian pop) 7:30 p.m., $30-$50, AA 

Thursday, Sept. 18

WASHINGTON STATE FAIR: Jeff Dunham (comedy ventriloquism) 7:30 p.m., $40-$75, AA

B SHARP COFFEE: Keith Henson Octet (jazz) 8 p.m., NC, AA

CHARLEY’S: Blues jam with Richard Molina, 8 p.m., NC

DAWSON’S: Billy Shew Band (open jam) 8 p.m., NC

HALF PINT: Dewey and the Peoples, Jeramy Abarca (reggae, rock) 10 p.m., NC 

KEYS ON MAIN: Dueling pianos, 9 p.m., NC

TACOMA COMEDY: Michael Somerville (comedy) 8 p.m., $10, 18+

UNCLE SAM’S: Jerry Miller (blues, rock) 7 p.m., NC September 09, 2014 at 09:23AM

Nightlife http://ift.tt/1tCweOR

Friday, Sept. 12

WASHINGTON STATE FAIR: Fall Out Boy, New Politics (pop-punk, emo) 7:30 p.m., $45-$55, AA

B SHARP COFFEE: Patti Allen (R&B, blues) 8 p.m., NC, AA

GREAT AMERICAN CASINO: Le Quyen (Vietnamese pop) 9 p.m., NC

HALF PINT: Velocity (rock) 9 p.m., NC

JAZZBONES: The Kirby Sewell Band (R&B, blues) 8 p.m., $15

KEYS ON MAIN: Dueling pianos, 9 p.m., NC

LOUIE G’S: Lady Justice, Jason Kertson & The Immortals, The Thrill (rock) 5 p.m., AA

MAXWELL’S: Lance Buller Trio (jazz) 7 p.m., NC

THE SWISS: Mr. Pink (dance) 9 p.m., $5-$10

TACOMA COMEDY: Ian Karmel (comedy) 8, 10:30 p.m., $15

UNCLE SAM’S: Taco Ninjas (metal) 9 p.m.

Saturday, Sept. 13

EMERALD QUEEN: Anthony Hamilton (soul, R&B) 8:30 p.m., $45-$100

B SHARP COFFEE: Jeff Ross Trio (pop, acoustic, folk) 8 p.m., NC, AA

BOB’S JAVA JIVE: Dionvox (darkwave, glo-fi) 8 p.m., AA

CHENEY STADIUM: Moveable Feast featuring Stephanie Anne Johnson, Seattle Rock Orchestra, The Tennants, Rusty Cleavers and more (eclectic) 4 and 6 p.m., NC, AA

GREAT AMERICAN CASINO: Sonic Funk Orchestra (dance) 9 p.m., NC

HALF PINT: Speakerbox (hip-hop) 9 p.m., AA

KEYS ON MAIN: Dueling pianos, 9 p.m., NC

LOUIE G’S: Amanda Hardy, Boneshaker, Darklight, Stolen Society (metal, hard rock) 8 p.m., AA

THE SPAR: Stonepony (rock) 8 p.m., NC

THE SWISS: The Spazmatics (’80s covers) 9 p.m., $5-$10

TACOMA COMEDY: Ian Karmel (comedy) 8, 10:30 p.m., $15

TACOMA DOME: Katy Perry, Tegan and Sara, Ferras (pop) 7:30 p.m., $40.50-$100.50, AA

WASHINGTON STATE FAIR: Keith Urban (country) 7:30 p.m., $40-$100, AA

Sunday, Sept. 14

WASHINGTON STATE FAIR: Teen Hoot (pop) 1 p.m., $20-$25, AA; Vicente Fernandez, Jr., Antonio Aguilar, Mariachi Azteca (Mexican pop) 7:30 p.m., $20-$27.50, AA

DAWSON’S: Tim Hall Band (open jam) 8 p.m., NC

NEW FRONTIER: 40 Grit (bluegrass jam) 3 p.m., NC

THE SPAR: Mark Dufresne (blues) 7 p.m., NC

TACOMA COMEDY: Stand-Up Truth or Dare (comedy) 8 p.m., $10, 18+

Monday, Sept. 15

THE SWISS: Hook Me Up (jazz) 9 p.m., NC

GIG SPOT: Monday Mash-Up open mic and trivia, 8 p.m., NC, AA

JAZZBONES: Rockaroke (live band karaoke) 11 p.m., NC

NEW FRONTIER: Open mic comedy, 9 p.m., NC

WASHINGTON STATE FAIR: Florida Georgia Line, Dallas Smith (country) 7:30 p.m., $40-$90, AA

Tuesday, Sept. 16

WASHINGTON STATE FAIR: Lindsey Stirling (violin, pop, EDM) 7:30 p.m., $20-$35, AA

ANTIQUE SANDWICH CO.: Open mic, 6:30 p.m., $3, AA

DAVE’S OF MILTON: Jerry Miller (blues, rock) 7 p.m., NC

JAZZBONES: Ha Ha Tuesday with host Ralph Porter (comedy) 8:30 p.m., $5

NEW FRONTIER: Open mic, 7 p.m., NC

STONEGATE: Leanne Trevalyan (acoustic open mic) 8 p.m., NC

Wednesday, Sept. 17

DAWSON’S: Linda Myers Band (open jam) 8 p.m., NC

JAZZBONES: Giant Panda Guerilla Dub Squad, Easy Star All-Stars (dub reggae) 8 p.m., $25

STONEGATE: Dave Nichols’ Hump Day Jam, 8:30 p.m., NC

TACOMA COMEDY: Comedy open mic, 8 p.m., NC, 18+

TOWER BAR & GRILL: Michelle Beaudry (jazz guitar) 4:30 p.m.

WASHINGTON STATE FAIR: Michael W. Smith, Amy Grant (Christian pop) 7:30 p.m., $30-$50, AA

Thursday, Sept. 18

WASHINGTON STATE FAIR: Jeff Dunham (comedy ventriloquism) 7:30 p.m., $40-$75, AA

B SHARP COFFEE: Keith Henson Octet (jazz) 8 p.m., NC, AA

CHARLEY’S: Blues jam with Richard Molina, 8 p.m., NC

DAWSON’S: Billy Shew Band (open jam) 8 p.m., NC

HALF PINT: Dewey and the Peoples, Jeramy Abarca (reggae, rock) 10 p.m., NC

KEYS ON MAIN: Dueling pianos, 9 p.m., NC

TACOMA COMEDY: Michael Somerville (comedy) 8 p.m., $10, 18+

UNCLE SAM’S: Jerry Miller (blues, rock) 7 p.m., NC

September 09, 2014 at 09:23AM

Culture Corner, A Guide to the Museums of Tacoma http://ift.tt/1tCwduf Museum of the Week:

Museum of Glass

1801 Dock St.

Wed. through Sat., 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Sun., noon to 5 p.m.

Info: http://ift.tt/1cgerIR

The Museum of Glass provides a dynamic learning environment to appreciate the medium of glass through creative experiences, collections and exhibitions.

This week’s events:

Glass Fusing Workshops

Saturdays 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Sundays 1–5 p.m.

Create your own fused glass art. Learn how to combine colorful glass shards, stringers and frit to create a one-of-a-kind glass tile OR two pendants/magnets. You design it, and we’ll fire it for you. Cost: $29, $26 members. Family Day weekends: $20 fusing special. Suitable for ages 6 to adult. Workshops start on the hour. Last session begins at 3 p.m. on Saturdays, 4 p.m. on Sundays. 

Elite Dance Studio Performance 

Sat., Sept 13, 1-1:30 p.m.

Elite Dance Studio will exhibit their dance studies with a performance of new works in the Grand Hall at 1pm and 3pm.

Family Day: Studies and Sashays 

Sat., Sept. 13, 1-4 p.m.

Get back into the school spirit and create your own customized pencil case and pencil set. Artist Jennifer Adams will help you learn new techniques to ensure you have the flashiest pencils in class. Elite Dance Studio will exhibit their dance studies with a performance of new works in the Grand Hall at 1 p.m. and 3 p.m.

New exhibits:

Hilltop Artists 20th Anniversary

Sept. 13 – Feb. 1

Museum of Glass and Hilltop Artists present Hilltop Artists 20th anniversary, an exhibition highlighting the impact of glass art on the lives of youth, the Hilltop neighborhood, and beyond. The exhibition will consist of glass objects, images, and videos, telling a story that spans the past 20 years of Hilltop Artists and the community it serves. Founded with the support of artist Dale Chihuly and the leadership of the Tacoma School District, gallery owner Kathy Kaperick envisioned Hilltop Artists as a place where young people from the Hilltop neighborhood could learn from established artists as a creative and constructive outlet. Gang-related crime and violence had made the Hilltop neighborhood notorious across the nation in the 1990s, but Kaperick believed art had the power to change the lives of at-risk youth and help keep them in school. Hilltop Artists 20th Anniversary is outlined by thematic pairs – Community and Creativity; Optimism and Resilience; Transformation and Collaboration – themes that not only demonstrate the growth that has made the organization what it is today, but also reflect the skills that Hilltop Artists instills in its students. These qualities are essential for social and academic success, helping Hilltop Artists to fulfill its mission of “using glass arts to connect youth from diverse cultural and economic backgrounds to better futures.”

Lightness of Being, New Sculpture by Howard Ben Tré

Sept. 13 – Jan. 4

Internationally recognized artist Howard Ben Tré will debut his exhibition of industrial, architecturally oriented sculptures in the Pacific Northwest at Museum of Glass from Sept.13 through Jan. 4. Creating a forest of vertical shapes, Ben Tré returns to his sculptural roots with “Lightness of Being – New Sculpture – Howard Ben Tré,” which will feature cast glass and bronze artworks up to eight feet tall. Ben Tré first made his mark in Tacoma in 2002 with his public sculpture commission, Water Forest, an outdoor installation of clear acrylic and bronze tubing that spouts water on the Museum’s main plaza. A pioneer in the use of cast glass as a sculptural medium, Ben Tré’s work has been displayed in 39 solo exhibitions across the United States and abroad and is included in over 80 museum and public collections worldwide. Ben Tré’s debut exhibition at Museum of Glass will remind visitors accustomed to watching glassblowing of the equally technical method of casting glass, as explored through architectural abstraction alongside an investigation of the human form. His forest of vertical sculptures in Lightness of Being will contain recognizable shapes, such as the lighthouse, obelisk, minaret and totem pole, while also evoking a sense of human form with sensual curves and shapes, deliberately positioned as hips and shoulders. A focal point in the series is the bubbles trapped in the glass, arrested in their natural inclination to rise. As the glass cooled, they became frozen, hanging in suspension often near the spire, drawing the eye upward and hinting at the connection to the title, the essential lightness that conveys a rising up, a spiritually informed sense of presence. The exhibition will also include several drawings by the artist, whose process often begins with small-scale drawings that gradually become enlarged on paper before being translated in three dimensions.

Ongoing exhibits:

Coastal Alchemy – Anna Skibska and Associates

Through Feb. 8

Known for her large-scale glass installations, Seattle-based artist Anna Skibska continues to explore the ways in which artworks are viewed with Coastal Alchemy, an exhibition of her newest work in collaboration with painter Meg Holgate and poet Trenton Flock. Skibska, who organized the exhibition, treats glass sculptures as just one of many collage elements that combine paper, photography, and even shadows on the wall, to create an immersive, abstract environment. Skibska’s new body of work also develops a self-referential “La Skibska” persona through a series of self-portraits and semi-autobiographical references that include her house and pet dog. Painter Meg Holgate surrounds Skibska’s collages with a series of ethereal landscapes and paints on glass for the first time, heightening the abstract quality of her artworks. Poet Trenton Flock contributes “Cannon Beach,” a poem that becomes an object in itself, suspended from the ceiling with the pages turned to the side.

Look! See? The Colors and Letters of Jen Elek and Jeremy Bert

Through Feb. 1

Seattle-based artists Jen Elek and Jeremy Bert have collaborated to present a multi-media exhibition that challenges assumptions about how art can be experienced in a museum setting. By actively encouraging visitors to not only touch but wear some of the artworks in the gallery, the artists are implicitly suggesting that art should be actively encountered rather than passively observed. The dynamic exhibition features a variety of glass sculptures combined with approximately 50 large, refurbished neon letters that visitors can touch, rearrange and wear like apparel. With a primary color palette reminiscent of children’s play equipment, “Look! See? The Colors and Letters of Jen Elek and Jeremy Bert” will engage visitors of all ages in an exploration of art.

Tacoma Museums:

Washington State History Museum

1911 Pacific Ave., Tacoma, WA 98402

Wed.- Sun., 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Info: http://ift.tt/15JEQFl

Fort Nisqually Living History Museum

Point Defiance Park, 5400 N. Pearl St.

Wed.-Sun., 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Info: http://ift.tt/1j30mP4

Tacoma Art Museum

1701 Pacific Ave.

Wed.–Sun., 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. (Closed Mondays and Tuesdays)

http://ift.tt/18n220B

Museum of Glass

1801 Dock St.

Wed.-Sat., 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Sun.,
noon to 5 p.m.

Info: http://ift.tt/H07qOw

Slater Museum of Natural History (currently under renovation)

University of Puget Sound

1500 N. Warner St. #1088


slatermuseum@pugetsound.edu

Collins Memorial Library

University of Puget Sound

1500 N. Warner St

http://ift.tt/1fkmjsD

Scandinavian Cultural Center

Pacific Lutheran University

Hours: Sun. 1-4 p.m., Tue. and Wed. 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Info: http://ift.tt/1fMe6NZ

Karpeles Manuscript Library Museum

407 S. G St.

Tues.-Sat., 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Info: http://ift.tt/1mc4QVV

Foss Waterway Seaport

705 Dock St.

Wed.-Sat., 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Sunday, noon-4 p.m.

Info: http://ift.tt/1cVeBGM

Buffalo Soldier Museum

1940 S. Wilkeson St.

Wed. and Sat., 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Info: http://ift.tt/1j30mP2

LeMay America’s Car Museum

2702 E. D St., Tacoma, WA 98421

Mon.-Sun., 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. 

Info: http://ift.tt/H0JSHE September 09, 2014 at 09:18AM

Culture Corner, A Guide to the Museums of Tacoma http://ift.tt/1tCwduf

Museum of the Week:

Museum of Glass

1801 Dock St.

Wed. through Sat., 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Sun., noon to 5 p.m.

Info: http://ift.tt/1cgerIR

The Museum of Glass provides a dynamic learning environment to appreciate the medium of glass through creative experiences, collections and exhibitions.

This week’s events:

Glass Fusing Workshops

Saturdays 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Sundays 1–5 p.m.

Create your own fused glass art. Learn how to combine colorful glass shards, stringers and frit to create a one-of-a-kind glass tile OR two pendants/magnets. You design it, and we’ll fire it for you. Cost: $29, $26 members. Family Day weekends: $20 fusing special. Suitable for ages 6 to adult. Workshops start on the hour. Last session begins at 3 p.m. on Saturdays, 4 p.m. on Sundays. 

Elite Dance Studio Performance

Sat., Sept 13, 1-1:30 p.m.

Elite Dance Studio will exhibit their dance studies with a performance of new works in the Grand Hall at 1pm and 3pm.

Family Day: Studies and Sashays

Sat., Sept. 13, 1-4 p.m.

Get back into the school spirit and create your own customized pencil case and pencil set. Artist Jennifer Adams will help you learn new techniques to ensure you have the flashiest pencils in class. Elite Dance Studio will exhibit their dance studies with a performance of new works in the Grand Hall at 1 p.m. and 3 p.m.

New exhibits:

Hilltop Artists 20th Anniversary

Sept. 13 – Feb. 1

Museum of Glass and Hilltop Artists present Hilltop Artists 20th anniversary, an exhibition highlighting the impact of glass art on the lives of youth, the Hilltop neighborhood, and beyond. The exhibition will consist of glass objects, images, and videos, telling a story that spans the past 20 years of Hilltop Artists and the community it serves. Founded with the support of artist Dale Chihuly and the leadership of the Tacoma School District, gallery owner Kathy Kaperick envisioned Hilltop Artists as a place where young people from the Hilltop neighborhood could learn from established artists as a creative and constructive outlet. Gang-related crime and violence had made the Hilltop neighborhood notorious across the nation in the 1990s, but Kaperick believed art had the power to change the lives of at-risk youth and help keep them in school. Hilltop Artists 20th Anniversary is outlined by thematic pairs – Community and Creativity; Optimism and Resilience; Transformation and Collaboration – themes that not only demonstrate the growth that has made the organization what it is today, but also reflect the skills that Hilltop Artists instills in its students. These qualities are essential for social and academic success, helping Hilltop Artists to fulfill its mission of “using glass arts to connect youth from diverse cultural and economic backgrounds to better futures.”

Lightness of Being, New Sculpture by Howard Ben Tré

Sept. 13 – Jan. 4

Internationally recognized artist Howard Ben Tré will debut his exhibition of industrial, architecturally oriented sculptures in the Pacific Northwest at Museum of Glass from Sept.13 through Jan. 4. Creating a forest of vertical shapes, Ben Tré returns to his sculptural roots with “Lightness of Being – New Sculpture – Howard Ben Tré,” which will feature cast glass and bronze artworks up to eight feet tall. Ben Tré first made his mark in Tacoma in 2002 with his public sculpture commission, Water Forest, an outdoor installation of clear acrylic and bronze tubing that spouts water on the Museum’s main plaza. A pioneer in the use of cast glass as a sculptural medium, Ben Tré’s work has been displayed in 39 solo exhibitions across the United States and abroad and is included in over 80 museum and public collections worldwide. Ben Tré’s debut exhibition at Museum of Glass will remind visitors accustomed to watching glassblowing of the equally technical method of casting glass, as explored through architectural abstraction alongside an investigation of the human form. His forest of vertical sculptures in Lightness of Being will contain recognizable shapes, such as the lighthouse, obelisk, minaret and totem pole, while also evoking a sense of human form with sensual curves and shapes, deliberately positioned as hips and shoulders. A focal point in the series is the bubbles trapped in the glass, arrested in their natural inclination to rise. As the glass cooled, they became frozen, hanging in suspension often near the spire, drawing the eye upward and hinting at the connection to the title, the essential lightness that conveys a rising up, a spiritually informed sense of presence. The exhibition will also include several drawings by the artist, whose process often begins with small-scale drawings that gradually become enlarged on paper before being translated in three dimensions.

Ongoing exhibits:

Coastal Alchemy – Anna Skibska and Associates

Through Feb. 8

Known for her large-scale glass installations, Seattle-based artist Anna Skibska continues to explore the ways in which artworks are viewed with Coastal Alchemy, an exhibition of her newest work in collaboration with painter Meg Holgate and poet Trenton Flock. Skibska, who organized the exhibition, treats glass sculptures as just one of many collage elements that combine paper, photography, and even shadows on the wall, to create an immersive, abstract environment. Skibska’s new body of work also develops a self-referential “La Skibska” persona through a series of self-portraits and semi-autobiographical references that include her house and pet dog. Painter Meg Holgate surrounds Skibska’s collages with a series of ethereal landscapes and paints on glass for the first time, heightening the abstract quality of her artworks. Poet Trenton Flock contributes “Cannon Beach,” a poem that becomes an object in itself, suspended from the ceiling with the pages turned to the side.

Look! See? The Colors and Letters of Jen Elek and Jeremy Bert

Through Feb. 1

Seattle-based artists Jen Elek and Jeremy Bert have collaborated to present a multi-media exhibition that challenges assumptions about how art can be experienced in a museum setting. By actively encouraging visitors to not only touch but wear some of the artworks in the gallery, the artists are implicitly suggesting that art should be actively encountered rather than passively observed. The dynamic exhibition features a variety of glass sculptures combined with approximately 50 large, refurbished neon letters that visitors can touch, rearrange and wear like apparel. With a primary color palette reminiscent of children’s play equipment, “Look! See? The Colors and Letters of Jen Elek and Jeremy Bert” will engage visitors of all ages in an exploration of art.

Tacoma Museums:

Washington State History Museum

1911 Pacific Ave., Tacoma, WA 98402

Wed.- Sun., 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Info: http://ift.tt/15JEQFl

Fort Nisqually Living History Museum

Point Defiance Park, 5400 N. Pearl St.

Wed.-Sun., 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Info: http://ift.tt/1j30mP4

Tacoma Art Museum

1701 Pacific Ave.

Wed.–Sun., 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. (Closed Mondays and Tuesdays)

http://ift.tt/18n220B

Museum of Glass

1801 Dock St.

Wed.-Sat., 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Sun.,
noon to 5 p.m.

Info: http://ift.tt/H07qOw

Slater Museum of Natural History (currently under renovation)

University of Puget Sound

1500 N. Warner St. #1088


slatermuseum@pugetsound.edu

Collins Memorial Library

University of Puget Sound

1500 N. Warner St

http://ift.tt/1fkmjsD

Scandinavian Cultural Center

Pacific Lutheran University

Hours: Sun. 1-4 p.m., Tue. and Wed. 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Info: http://ift.tt/1fMe6NZ

Karpeles Manuscript Library Museum

407 S. G St.

Tues.-Sat., 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Info: http://ift.tt/1mc4QVV

Foss Waterway Seaport

705 Dock St.

Wed.-Sat., 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Sunday, noon-4 p.m.

Info: http://ift.tt/1cVeBGM

Buffalo Soldier Museum

1940 S. Wilkeson St.

Wed. and Sat., 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Info: http://ift.tt/1j30mP2

LeMay America’s Car Museum

2702 E. D St., Tacoma, WA 98421

Mon.-Sun., 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Info: http://ift.tt/H0JSHE

September 09, 2014 at 09:18AM