Nightlife http://ift.tt/11vUSsy TW PICK OF THE WEEK: Revelers at Maltoberfest 9 will guzzle copious amounts of Brass Monkey on Oct. 18 as they groove to DJ Melodica, The Breakfast Cowboy, 508 Disturbance, Brainstorm and Olympia’s Artesian Rumble Arkestra (pictured). The Oktoberfest parody – dedicated to cheap malt liquor – will kick off at 7 p.m. at Stonegate Pizza, and admission set at $15; http://ift.tt/11vUSsA.

Friday, Oct. 17

HALF PINT: Indigenous Robot, Static and the Cubes (garage-rock) 9 p.m., NC 

DOYLE’S: St. Practice Day with Polecat (bluegrass, reggae, world) 9 p.m., NC

KEYS ON MAIN: Dueling pianos, 9 p.m., NC

MAXWELL’S: Lance Buller Trio (jazz) 7 p.m., NC

NORTHERN PACIFIC: Voxxy Vallejo, Michele Ari, Clearly Beloved (rock, singer-songwriter) 7 p.m., NC, AA

STONEGATE: Rumble Underground (rock) 9 p.m., NC

THE SWISS: Sin City (Top 40) 9 p.m., $5-$10

TACOMA COMEDY: Ron Funches (comedy) 8, 10:30 p.m., $15

UNCLE SAM’S: I Fell Down, Saintz of Mayhem, Surgical Kaos (rock) 8 p.m.

UNCLE THURM’S: CJK with Gary Crooks, Mike Jaap and Kurt Kolstad (jazz) 7:30 p.m., NC, AA

Saturday, Oct. 18

STONEGATE: Rumble Underground (rock) 9 p.m., NC

B SHARP COFFEE: Kareem Kandi Trio (jazz) 8 p.m., NC, AA

DOYLE’S: A Ceder Suede (world, funk) 9:30 p.m., NC 

EMERALD QUEEN: Tim Allen (comedy) 8:30 p.m., $40-$100

GREAT AMERICAN CASINO: Vietnamese night (Vietnamese pop) 9 p.m., NC

JAZZBONES: Folsom Prism (Johnny Cash tribute) 8 p.m., $8

KEYS ON MAIN: Dueling pianos, 9 p.m., NC

LOUIE G’S: Louie G’s Birthday Bash with Amadon, Klover Jane, A Lien Nation, Prophets of Addiction (rock) 6 p.m., NC, AA

RIALTO: Tacoma Concert Band presents “Spring this Fall” (classical) 7:30 p.m., $18-$36, AA

THE SPAR: Tatoosh (classic rock) 8 p.m., NC

THE SWISS: Kry (rock covers) 9 p.m., $5-$10

TACOMA COMEDY: Ron Funches (comedy) 8, 10:30 p.m., $15

UNCLE SAM’S: Generation Unknown (rock) 8 p.m.

Sunday, Oct. 19

THE SPAR: Rod Cook and Toast (blues, rock) 7 p.m., NC

DAWSON’S: Tim Hall Band (open jam) 8 p.m., NC

NEW FRONTIER: 40 Grit (bluegrass jam) 3 p.m., NC

TACOMA COMEDY: Battle of the Sexes: Halloween Edition (comedy) 8 p.m., $10, 18+

Monday, Oct. 20

NEW FRONTIER: Open mic comedy with Eric “Puddin’” Lorentzen, 9 p.m., NC

B SHARP COFFEE: Stay Sharp Poetry with William James Hassertt (spoken word) 5 p.m., NC, AA

GIG SPOT: Monday Mash-Up open mic and trivia, 8 p.m., NC, AA

JAZZBONES: Rockaroke (live band karaoke) 11 p.m., NC

THE SWISS: Dean Reichert (blues) 9 p.m., NC

Tuesday, Oct. 21

JAZZBONES: Ha Ha Tuesday with host Ralph Porter (comedy) 8:30 p.m., $5ANTIQUE SANDWICH CO.: Open mic, 6:30 p.m., $3, AA

DAVE’S OF MILTON: Jerry Miller (blues, rock) 7 p.m., NC

NEW FRONTIER: Open mic, 7 p.m., NC

STONEGATE: Leanne Trevalyan (acoustic open mic) 8 p.m., NC

Wednesday, Oct. 22

JAZZBONES: Speeding Kills Bears, Pasadena (indie-rock) 8 p.m., $5

DAWSON’S: Linda Myers Band (open jam) 8 p.m., NC

STONEGATE: Dave Nichols’ Hump Day Jam, 8:30 p.m., NC

TACOMA COMEDY: Comedy open mic, 8 p.m., NC, 18+

TOWER BAR & GRILL: Michelle Beaudry (jazz guitar) 4:30 p.m.

Thursday, Oct. 23

DAWSON’S: Billy Shew Band (open jam) 8 p.m., NC

CHARLEY’S: Blues jam with Richard Molina, 8 p.m., NC

KEYS ON MAIN: Dueling pianos, 9 p.m., NC

TACOMA COMEDY: Marc Ryan (comedy) 8 p.m., $10, 18+ October 15, 2014 at 02:40PM

Nightlife http://ift.tt/11vUSsy

TW PICK OF THE WEEK: Revelers at Maltoberfest 9 will guzzle copious amounts of Brass Monkey on Oct. 18 as they groove to DJ Melodica, The Breakfast Cowboy, 508 Disturbance, Brainstorm and Olympia’s Artesian Rumble Arkestra (pictured). The Oktoberfest parody – dedicated to cheap malt liquor – will kick off at 7 p.m. at Stonegate Pizza, and admission set at $15; http://ift.tt/11vUSsA.

Friday, Oct. 17

HALF PINT: Indigenous Robot, Static and the Cubes (garage-rock) 9 p.m., NC

DOYLE’S: St. Practice Day with Polecat (bluegrass, reggae, world) 9 p.m., NC

KEYS ON MAIN: Dueling pianos, 9 p.m., NC

MAXWELL’S: Lance Buller Trio (jazz) 7 p.m., NC

NORTHERN PACIFIC: Voxxy Vallejo, Michele Ari, Clearly Beloved (rock, singer-songwriter) 7 p.m., NC, AA

STONEGATE: Rumble Underground (rock) 9 p.m., NC

THE SWISS: Sin City (Top 40) 9 p.m., $5-$10

TACOMA COMEDY: Ron Funches (comedy) 8, 10:30 p.m., $15

UNCLE SAM’S: I Fell Down, Saintz of Mayhem, Surgical Kaos (rock) 8 p.m.

UNCLE THURM’S: CJK with Gary Crooks, Mike Jaap and Kurt Kolstad (jazz) 7:30 p.m., NC, AA

Saturday, Oct. 18

STONEGATE: Rumble Underground (rock) 9 p.m., NC

B SHARP COFFEE: Kareem Kandi Trio (jazz) 8 p.m., NC, AA

DOYLE’S: A Ceder Suede (world, funk) 9:30 p.m., NC

EMERALD QUEEN: Tim Allen (comedy) 8:30 p.m., $40-$100

GREAT AMERICAN CASINO: Vietnamese night (Vietnamese pop) 9 p.m., NC

JAZZBONES: Folsom Prism (Johnny Cash tribute) 8 p.m., $8

KEYS ON MAIN: Dueling pianos, 9 p.m., NC

LOUIE G’S: Louie G’s Birthday Bash with Amadon, Klover Jane, A Lien Nation, Prophets of Addiction (rock) 6 p.m., NC, AA

RIALTO: Tacoma Concert Band presents “Spring this Fall” (classical) 7:30 p.m., $18-$36, AA

THE SPAR: Tatoosh (classic rock) 8 p.m., NC

THE SWISS: Kry (rock covers) 9 p.m., $5-$10

TACOMA COMEDY: Ron Funches (comedy) 8, 10:30 p.m., $15

UNCLE SAM’S: Generation Unknown (rock) 8 p.m.

Sunday, Oct. 19

THE SPAR: Rod Cook and Toast (blues, rock) 7 p.m., NC

DAWSON’S: Tim Hall Band (open jam) 8 p.m., NC

NEW FRONTIER: 40 Grit (bluegrass jam) 3 p.m., NC

TACOMA COMEDY: Battle of the Sexes: Halloween Edition (comedy) 8 p.m., $10, 18+

Monday, Oct. 20

NEW FRONTIER: Open mic comedy with Eric “Puddin’” Lorentzen, 9 p.m., NC

B SHARP COFFEE: Stay Sharp Poetry with William James Hassertt (spoken word) 5 p.m., NC, AA

GIG SPOT: Monday Mash-Up open mic and trivia, 8 p.m., NC, AA

JAZZBONES: Rockaroke (live band karaoke) 11 p.m., NC

THE SWISS: Dean Reichert (blues) 9 p.m., NC

Tuesday, Oct. 21

JAZZBONES: Ha Ha Tuesday with host Ralph Porter (comedy) 8:30 p.m., $5ANTIQUE SANDWICH CO.: Open mic, 6:30 p.m., $3, AA

DAVE’S OF MILTON: Jerry Miller (blues, rock) 7 p.m., NC

NEW FRONTIER: Open mic, 7 p.m., NC

STONEGATE: Leanne Trevalyan (acoustic open mic) 8 p.m., NC

Wednesday, Oct. 22

JAZZBONES: Speeding Kills Bears, Pasadena (indie-rock) 8 p.m., $5

DAWSON’S: Linda Myers Band (open jam) 8 p.m., NC

STONEGATE: Dave Nichols’ Hump Day Jam, 8:30 p.m., NC

TACOMA COMEDY: Comedy open mic, 8 p.m., NC, 18+

TOWER BAR & GRILL: Michelle Beaudry (jazz guitar) 4:30 p.m.

Thursday, Oct. 23

DAWSON’S: Billy Shew Band (open jam) 8 p.m., NC

CHARLEY’S: Blues jam with Richard Molina, 8 p.m., NC

KEYS ON MAIN: Dueling pianos, 9 p.m., NC

TACOMA COMEDY: Marc Ryan (comedy) 8 p.m., $10, 18+

October 15, 2014 at 02:40PM

China Davis impresses with new http://ift.tt/1xW367U The latest album from China Davis, “Arctic Days,” starts off with a somber and relaxing melody layered with alternating acoustic and electric guitars giving ample room for vocalist Ben Fuller to do his thing. It’s an epic tune called “Anjilla” that’s well arranged, and clearly a lot of work was put into it to get it just right. The song speaks of the waves, shoreline and maybe a little bit of the sailor’s life. This song charts the path for the rest of album and it was my personal favorite, with the title track coming in a close second. 

Song number three, “Beautiful Girl” is reminiscent of early U2, with Fuller’s voice taking center stage with the instrumentation complimenting the heart-felt lyrics written about Fuller’s daughter. All through the CD, the instruments seem to never get in the way or over power his voice, as he tells story after story in these songs. This collection of tunes has a theme that comes up time and again, and that is the water. Whether it is the open sea, a lake or a river, Fuller has poetically woven that common thread into the fabric of the songs. He sings these with an almost urgency to get these words out of himself and out into the universe.  

China Davis was formed by brothers Ben and Ted Fuller in Gig Harbor, and their music has that sort of small town fishing village honesty about it. “Arctic Days” is not an album full of frills or tricks but rather it’s a truthful artistic expression of a few musicians that do this because they probably need to. The album shows some slight similarities to their 2007 release, “Shadowdancing,” which had a song called “The Lark” that I still love to this day. This album is, however, a bit more subdued, and songs like the fifth track “In The Way,” powered by a lovely piano melody and great backing vocals, sounds like something Springsteen could have come up with in his earlier days. 

Parts of the album were recorded at Urban Grace Church in Tacoma and The Arctic Garage in Seattle with the aforementioned Ben Fuller on vocals, guitar and the piano while his brother, Ted, contributes the tasty lead guitar throughout. Eric Balcom did the bulk of the bass tracks, and Andrew Stockton turned in a fine job on the drums. China Davis is a unique band with a distinct yet familiar sound that follows no tired and worn out formula. The album doesn’t feel as if they were out to reinvent the wheel; they just made the music that comes natural to them.

The final tune on Arctic Days is a guitar ballad that once again showcases Ben Fuller’s steady voice, a theme that is consistent throughout the album, as he seems to call to and conjure up an angel from out at sea. The collection of songs is an introspective musical journey for the band that leaves nothing to be desired and the record is definitely worth a listen. 

“Arctic Days” can be found online at bandcamp.com. October 15, 2014 at 02:28PM

China Davis impresses with new http://ift.tt/1xW367U

The latest album from China Davis, “Arctic Days,” starts off with a somber and relaxing melody layered with alternating acoustic and electric guitars giving ample room for vocalist Ben Fuller to do his thing. It’s an epic tune called “Anjilla” that’s well arranged, and clearly a lot of work was put into it to get it just right. The song speaks of the waves, shoreline and maybe a little bit of the sailor’s life. This song charts the path for the rest of album and it was my personal favorite, with the title track coming in a close second. 

Song number three, “Beautiful Girl” is reminiscent of early U2, with Fuller’s voice taking center stage with the instrumentation complimenting the heart-felt lyrics written about Fuller’s daughter. All through the CD, the instruments seem to never get in the way or over power his voice, as he tells story after story in these songs. This collection of tunes has a theme that comes up time and again, and that is the water. Whether it is the open sea, a lake or a river, Fuller has poetically woven that common thread into the fabric of the songs. He sings these with an almost urgency to get these words out of himself and out into the universe.  

China Davis was formed by brothers Ben and Ted Fuller in Gig Harbor, and their music has that sort of small town fishing village honesty about it. “Arctic Days” is not an album full of frills or tricks but rather it’s a truthful artistic expression of a few musicians that do this because they probably need to. The album shows some slight similarities to their 2007 release, “Shadowdancing,” which had a song called “The Lark” that I still love to this day. This album is, however, a bit more subdued, and songs like the fifth track “In The Way,” powered by a lovely piano melody and great backing vocals, sounds like something Springsteen could have come up with in his earlier days. 

Parts of the album were recorded at Urban Grace Church in Tacoma and The Arctic Garage in Seattle with the aforementioned Ben Fuller on vocals, guitar and the piano while his brother, Ted, contributes the tasty lead guitar throughout. Eric Balcom did the bulk of the bass tracks, and Andrew Stockton turned in a fine job on the drums. China Davis is a unique band with a distinct yet familiar sound that follows no tired and worn out formula. The album doesn’t feel as if they were out to reinvent the wheel; they just made the music that comes natural to them.

The final tune on Arctic Days is a guitar ballad that once again showcases Ben Fuller’s steady voice, a theme that is consistent throughout the album, as he seems to call to and conjure up an angel from out at sea. The collection of songs is an introspective musical journey for the band that leaves nothing to be desired and the record is definitely worth a listen. 

“Arctic Days” can be found online at bandcamp.com.

October 15, 2014 at 02:28PM

Centerstage explores the good, the bad of sex with “My First Time” http://ift.tt/11vUQAW Whether “the event” is planned or spontaneous, pleasant or horrible, the moment people lose their virginity contains a memorable story.

Here are some of those stories.

Centerstage’s season opener is a well-crafted collection of “losing one’s virginity” stories collected from a website, MyFirstTime.com, that has operated since 1998 and contains thousands of stories from around the world. Some stories presented in this off-Broadway hit are sweet and loving, others are violent and horrific. Others are hilariously filled with awkward bouts with surging hormones, while others are flooded with reason and senses of purpose. They are all, ultimately, stories about the myriad worlds of humanity found on this dustball floating in space.

Ken Davenport, author of “Altar Boyz” culled through the more than 100,000 “first time” stories to craft a single play that spans the spectrum of sexuality so that every audience member could both relate to the show and be challenged by it.

At the root of the show’s genius is its seeming simplicity. Actors are given stories written by others and asked to perform them. There are no character profiles or background or plots or unifying settings actors could draw from to craft their performances. They simply had to bring the words to life however they saw fit. One attempt might mean a Southern accent, while another draws straight from the mouths of a Jersey girl.

Anna Kasabyan, making her directorial debut, clearly let the actors “explore through failure” in finding just the right character for otherwise lifeless words in a script. Hannah Ruwe, Joe Cummings, Joshua Williamson and Leah Pfenning obviously had fun along the theatrical journey. Their chemistry, both with their own monologue and each other, was brilliantly evident. 

Their parade of monologues stitched together with quickly timed word play and casually natural asides created a whole rather than a collection of parts that didn’t require extensive scene shifts or wardrobe changes. The play rolls on through the minds of the audience members, who often seem more like friends gathered around a table to share “first time” stories over a bottle of wine than theatergoers watching a performance.

Because of its content matter, “My First Time,” is recommended for mature audiences only. The play runs at 8 p.m. on Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays and at 2 p.m. on Sundays through Oct. 26 at Centerstage, 3200 SW Dash Point Rd. in Federal Way. Tickets are available at 

http://ift.tt/11vUQAZ or by calling (253) 661-1444. October 15, 2014 at 02:23PM

Centerstage explores the good, the bad of sex with “My First Time” http://ift.tt/11vUQAW

Whether “the event” is planned or spontaneous, pleasant or horrible, the moment people lose their virginity contains a memorable story.

Here are some of those stories.

Centerstage’s season opener is a well-crafted collection of “losing one’s virginity” stories collected from a website, MyFirstTime.com, that has operated since 1998 and contains thousands of stories from around the world. Some stories presented in this off-Broadway hit are sweet and loving, others are violent and horrific. Others are hilariously filled with awkward bouts with surging hormones, while others are flooded with reason and senses of purpose. They are all, ultimately, stories about the myriad worlds of humanity found on this dustball floating in space.

Ken Davenport, author of “Altar Boyz” culled through the more than 100,000 “first time” stories to craft a single play that spans the spectrum of sexuality so that every audience member could both relate to the show and be challenged by it.

At the root of the show’s genius is its seeming simplicity. Actors are given stories written by others and asked to perform them. There are no character profiles or background or plots or unifying settings actors could draw from to craft their performances. They simply had to bring the words to life however they saw fit. One attempt might mean a Southern accent, while another draws straight from the mouths of a Jersey girl.

Anna Kasabyan, making her directorial debut, clearly let the actors “explore through failure” in finding just the right character for otherwise lifeless words in a script. Hannah Ruwe, Joe Cummings, Joshua Williamson and Leah Pfenning obviously had fun along the theatrical journey. Their chemistry, both with their own monologue and each other, was brilliantly evident.

Their parade of monologues stitched together with quickly timed word play and casually natural asides created a whole rather than a collection of parts that didn’t require extensive scene shifts or wardrobe changes. The play rolls on through the minds of the audience members, who often seem more like friends gathered around a table to share “first time” stories over a bottle of wine than theatergoers watching a performance.

Because of its content matter, “My First Time,” is recommended for mature audiences only. The play runs at 8 p.m. on Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays and at 2 p.m. on Sundays through Oct. 26 at Centerstage, 3200 SW Dash Point Rd. in Federal Way. Tickets are available at

http://ift.tt/11vUQAZ or by calling (253) 661-1444.

October 15, 2014 at 02:23PM

Tacoma’s Metal-Urge Galvanizes Regional Arts Community http://ift.tt/1xW35Rm Metal-Urge, a citywide celebration of metal arts, explores the many ways that artists push this versatile and diverse medium. From Oct. 1-Nov. 30, 31 Tacoma venues will feature metal-themed exhibits, workshops, lectures, festivals and more. 

“Metal-Urge really embraces the many ways that metal is used as an art form, from sculpture and jewelry to cars and brass musical instruments,” said Tacoma Arts Administrator Amy McBride. “More than 80 regional metal artists are exhibiting throughout the city, Tacoma Art Museum is bringing a major metals exhibit to town, and we welcome the 19th Annual Seattle Metals Guild Symposium to Tacoma for the first time.” 

Some Metal-Urge highlights include:

Metal-Urge Free Community Festival

Come out for a free, fun-filled afternoon of metal arts on Oct. 19 from noon-3 p.m. at Tollefson Plaza (South 17th Street and Pacific Avenue). Below the majesty of Mary Coss’ site-specific public art installation “Three Graces,” watch live sword fighting reenactments by Knights of Veritas, see a molten iron pour and create a scratch block with Tacoma Community College’s sculpture department, and check out a blacksmithing demonstration with Lisa Geertson and Scott Szloch. Try your hand at making a textured metal charm with Tacoma Metal Arts Center and participate in some hands-on crafts with Tacoma Art Museum. Do all this while listening to steel drum music under the direction of Miho Takekawa and munching on refreshments from food trucks.

Protective Ornament: Contemporary Amulets to Armor

This exhibit at Tacoma Art Museum (1701 Pacific Ave.), running Oct. 18-Feb. 1, 2015, showcases nearly 100 pieces including helmets, brass knuckles, breastplates, aggressive or defensive jewelry, chain mail, amulets, talismans, and protective gear designed to address issues of protection and empowerment in the face of everyday perils and social challenges. Ranging from protective hardware (physical fortification) and protective “software” (faith-based adornment), the array of contemporary works underlines the crucial safeguarding function of jewelry and other wearable ornaments. Organized by the National Ornamental Metal Museum Foundation, Inc., the exhibition was curated by Metalsmith magazine editor Suzanne Ramljak.

Seattle Metals Guild 19th Annual Northwest Jewelry & Metals Symposium

This metal arts symposium, held on Oct. 19 at the Washington State History Museum (1911 Pacific Ave.) features lectures by Metalsmith magazine editor Suzanne Ramljak, historian Stephen Fliegel, Vivian Beer, artist Jennifer Trask, jeweler Todd Pownell, and metalsmith Myra Mimlitsch-Gray. For more information, or to register, visit http://ift.tt/1xW33sE.

For more information visit TacomaMetalUrge.com. Metal-Urge is organized by the Tacoma Arts Commission and sponsored by Click! Cable TV and The Greater Tacoma Community Foundation. October 15, 2014 at 02:08PM

Tacoma’s Metal-Urge Galvanizes Regional Arts Community http://ift.tt/1xW35Rm

Metal-Urge, a citywide celebration of metal arts, explores the many ways that artists push this versatile and diverse medium. From Oct. 1-Nov. 30, 31 Tacoma venues will feature metal-themed exhibits, workshops, lectures, festivals and more.

“Metal-Urge really embraces the many ways that metal is used as an art form, from sculpture and jewelry to cars and brass musical instruments,” said Tacoma Arts Administrator Amy McBride. “More than 80 regional metal artists are exhibiting throughout the city, Tacoma Art Museum is bringing a major metals exhibit to town, and we welcome the 19th Annual Seattle Metals Guild Symposium to Tacoma for the first time.”

Some Metal-Urge highlights include:

Metal-Urge Free Community Festival

Come out for a free, fun-filled afternoon of metal arts on Oct. 19 from noon-3 p.m. at Tollefson Plaza (South 17th Street and Pacific Avenue). Below the majesty of Mary Coss’ site-specific public art installation “Three Graces,” watch live sword fighting reenactments by Knights of Veritas, see a molten iron pour and create a scratch block with Tacoma Community College’s sculpture department, and check out a blacksmithing demonstration with Lisa Geertson and Scott Szloch. Try your hand at making a textured metal charm with Tacoma Metal Arts Center and participate in some hands-on crafts with Tacoma Art Museum. Do all this while listening to steel drum music under the direction of Miho Takekawa and munching on refreshments from food trucks.

Protective Ornament: Contemporary Amulets to Armor

This exhibit at Tacoma Art Museum (1701 Pacific Ave.), running Oct. 18-Feb. 1, 2015, showcases nearly 100 pieces including helmets, brass knuckles, breastplates, aggressive or defensive jewelry, chain mail, amulets, talismans, and protective gear designed to address issues of protection and empowerment in the face of everyday perils and social challenges. Ranging from protective hardware (physical fortification) and protective “software” (faith-based adornment), the array of contemporary works underlines the crucial safeguarding function of jewelry and other wearable ornaments. Organized by the National Ornamental Metal Museum Foundation, Inc., the exhibition was curated by Metalsmith magazine editor Suzanne Ramljak.

Seattle Metals Guild 19th Annual Northwest Jewelry & Metals Symposium

This metal arts symposium, held on Oct. 19 at the Washington State History Museum (1911 Pacific Ave.) features lectures by Metalsmith magazine editor Suzanne Ramljak, historian Stephen Fliegel, Vivian Beer, artist Jennifer Trask, jeweler Todd Pownell, and metalsmith Myra Mimlitsch-Gray. For more information, or to register, visit http://ift.tt/1xW33sE.

For more information visit TacomaMetalUrge.com. Metal-Urge is organized by the Tacoma Arts Commission and sponsored by Click! Cable TV and The Greater Tacoma Community Foundation.

October 15, 2014 at 02:08PM

Culture Corner http://ift.tt/11vUN8a Washington State Historical Museum

1911 Pacific Ave., Tacoma, WA 98402

Wed.-Sun., 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Info: http://ift.tt/15JEQFl

The Washington State History Museum is where fascination and fun come together. People of all ages can explore and be entertained in an environment where characters from Washington’s past speak about their lives. Through interactive exhibits, theatrical storytelling, high-tech displays and dramatic artifacts, learn about our state’s unique people and places, as well as their impact on the country and the world.

This weeks events:

American Pandemic: The Lost Worlds of the 1918 Pandemic

Oct. 18, 1 p.m.

University of Puget Sound historian and professor Dr. Nancy Bristow presents an illustrated program on the global influenza pandemic that began at the end of World War I. How did the flu affect Americans reeling from their involvement in the Great War? What did our country do to combat this deadly infection? What is the connection between the flu and the war? Special presentation at 2 p.m. Joining Bristow will be a public health expert to talk about current planning for pandemic and localized medical emergencies focused on infectious disease. Learn about growing your own food and safe practices of home food preservation from community garden and food safety experts.

Self-Sufficiency: WWI and the Food Movement to be Self-Sufficient

Oct. 18, 3 p.m.

During the Great War, Americans were encouraged to grow and can their own food, partly because a lot of the mass-produced food was sent to Europe to feed the troops and the French citizens. Americans were asked to substitute potatoes for flour, use peanut butter, and become more self-sufficient at feeding themselves. During this presentation, try samples of harvest produce eaten commonly 100 years ago.

Curator Talk and Tour: Seeds of Victory with Jim Givan

Oct. 18, 11 a.m.

Mr. Jim Givan will present a talk on his large poster collection focused on military themes, which forms the heart of “Seeds of Victory: Posters of the Great War.” In addition to a post-presentation gallery tour, Givan, a natural storyteller, will share his expertise on how to build a focused collection, how to spot fakes and forgeries, and how to look for quality pieces at good value. Hear about his most remarkable finds. 

Exhibits:

Time Intrusionator

Through Jan., 2015

Who will be the next Keeper? Could it be you? Enter the fabulous-miraculous world of Ernest Oglby Punkweiler and journey to unexpected places in time. Enter through the Teapot Curiosity Shop, the tiny-but-extraordinary empire of The Keeper. Based on a children’s story of the same name, this exhibit allows you to explore along with young Ernest and “intrusionate” in time. The secret to success? Bring your camera and your imagination!

Seeds of Victory: Posters of the Great War

This year is the 100th anniversary of the beginning of World War I, which was known as the “War to End All Wars” and “The Great War.” Though the peace afterward was short lived, WWI was a significant conflict supported by the American government through a newly formed special agency they called the Committee on Public Information charged with the task of creating a propaganda campaign. The key to this campaign’s success was the war poster – a propaganda tool that could evoke emotion and motivate action. “Seeds of Victory: Posters of the Great War” is a beautiful private collection of the historical works of art that stirred Americans to volunteer for service, buy liberty bonds, grow victory gardens, live on rations, and support the cause. On loan from collectors Jim and Sheron Givan, the posters illustrate how popular art can inspire a nation and change the course of history. 

Pomp & Circumstance: The Clothing of Transformation

From cradle to grave, the milestones in our lives are represented by clothing that signifies a transformation. Whether we are being baptized, getting married, winning a prestigious award, or joining a secret society, we create often elaborate garments that become heirlooms and collector’s items. These garments are cherished by those who wore them, and they show how not only we transform within our own lives, but also how our culture transforms over time. Explore the Pomp & Circumstance behind the Clothing of Transformation. October 15, 2014 at 01:53PM

Culture Corner http://ift.tt/11vUN8a

Washington State Historical Museum

1911 Pacific Ave., Tacoma, WA 98402

Wed.-Sun., 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Info: http://ift.tt/15JEQFl

The Washington State History Museum is where fascination and fun come together. People of all ages can explore and be entertained in an environment where characters from Washington’s past speak about their lives. Through interactive exhibits, theatrical storytelling, high-tech displays and dramatic artifacts, learn about our state’s unique people and places, as well as their impact on the country and the world.

This weeks events: American Pandemic: The Lost Worlds of the 1918 Pandemic

Oct. 18, 1 p.m.

University of Puget Sound historian and professor Dr. Nancy Bristow presents an illustrated program on the global influenza pandemic that began at the end of World War I. How did the flu affect Americans reeling from their involvement in the Great War? What did our country do to combat this deadly infection? What is the connection between the flu and the war? Special presentation at 2 p.m. Joining Bristow will be a public health expert to talk about current planning for pandemic and localized medical emergencies focused on infectious disease. Learn about growing your own food and safe practices of home food preservation from community garden and food safety experts.

Self-Sufficiency: WWI and the Food Movement to be Self-Sufficient

Oct. 18, 3 p.m.

During the Great War, Americans were encouraged to grow and can their own food, partly because a lot of the mass-produced food was sent to Europe to feed the troops and the French citizens. Americans were asked to substitute potatoes for flour, use peanut butter, and become more self-sufficient at feeding themselves. During this presentation, try samples of harvest produce eaten commonly 100 years ago.

Curator Talk and Tour: Seeds of Victory with Jim Givan

Oct. 18, 11 a.m.

Mr. Jim Givan will present a talk on his large poster collection focused on military themes, which forms the heart of “Seeds of Victory: Posters of the Great War.” In addition to a post-presentation gallery tour, Givan, a natural storyteller, will share his expertise on how to build a focused collection, how to spot fakes and forgeries, and how to look for quality pieces at good value. Hear about his most remarkable finds.

Exhibits: Time Intrusionator

Through Jan., 2015

Who will be the next Keeper? Could it be you? Enter the fabulous-miraculous world of Ernest Oglby Punkweiler and journey to unexpected places in time. Enter through the Teapot Curiosity Shop, the tiny-but-extraordinary empire of The Keeper. Based on a children’s story of the same name, this exhibit allows you to explore along with young Ernest and “intrusionate” in time. The secret to success? Bring your camera and your imagination!

Seeds of Victory: Posters of the Great War

This year is the 100th anniversary of the beginning of World War I, which was known as the “War to End All Wars” and “The Great War.” Though the peace afterward was short lived, WWI was a significant conflict supported by the American government through a newly formed special agency they called the Committee on Public Information charged with the task of creating a propaganda campaign. The key to this campaign’s success was the war poster – a propaganda tool that could evoke emotion and motivate action. “Seeds of Victory: Posters of the Great War” is a beautiful private collection of the historical works of art that stirred Americans to volunteer for service, buy liberty bonds, grow victory gardens, live on rations, and support the cause. On loan from collectors Jim and Sheron Givan, the posters illustrate how popular art can inspire a nation and change the course of history.

Pomp & Circumstance: The Clothing of Transformation

From cradle to grave, the milestones in our lives are represented by clothing that signifies a transformation. Whether we are being baptized, getting married, winning a prestigious award, or joining a secret society, we create often elaborate garments that become heirlooms and collector’s items. These garments are cherished by those who wore them, and they show how not only we transform within our own lives, but also how our culture transforms over time. Explore the Pomp & Circumstance behind the Clothing of Transformation.

October 15, 2014 at 01:53PM

The Things We Like http://ift.tt/1xW33c8 EVELYN GLENNIE

Percussion superstar Dame Evelyn Glennie will take center stage with her vast array of instruments Oct. 25 when the Tacoma Symphony Orchestra opens its 2014-2015 performance season at Pantages Theater, 7:30 p.m. The new season opener will also mark the inaugural concert of new Music Director Sarah Ioannides, whose appointment was announced late last year on the heels of a two-year search encompassing a hundred international applicants. For tickets, $19 and up, visit http://ift.tt/QIElvB or call (253) 591-5894.

‘THE BOYS NEXT DOOR’

Pacific Lutheran University’s School of Arts and Communication and the Department of Communication & Theatre present “The Boys Next Door” by Tom Griffin, directed by Jeff CLapp. The production opens in Eastvold Auditorium of the Karen Hille Phillips Center for the Performing Arts on Oct. 17, 18, 24 and 25 at 7:30 p.m. and Oct. 26 at 2 p.m. This touching, funny play focuses on the lives of four disabled men in a communal residence where little things sometimes become momentous (and often funny), with are moments of great poignancy that remind us that the handicapped, like the rest of us, want only to love and laugh and find purpose in this world. Tickets can be purchased thought the Community Box Office on the first level of the Anderson University Center or call (253) 535-7411. 

COSTUME CONCERT

Tacoma Youth Symphony celebrates the Halloween season with a “Costume Concert” on Saturday, Oct. 25, 7 p.m. at Urban Grace Church, 902 Market St. The young musicians will be dressed as characters from the movies, and the audience is invited to come in costume too. The concert will feature music from “The Fellowship of the Ring,” “Star Wars,” Disney’s “Frozen,” “The Lone Ranger,” “Close Encounters of the Third Kind” and “A Muppet Medley.” Tickets: $13, $19, and $46 for a family four-pack. Call (253) 627-2792 to purchase individual tickets or group packages for the 14-15 season.

HALLOWEEN SKATE

Join the girls from Tacoma All Stars Sports Academy, their friends and families for a fun night of spooky skating at Rollin 253 Skate and Community Center, 2101 Mildred St. W. in Fircrest, 6-8 p.m. Fun for the entire family. Costumes encouraged but not required – there will be a costume contest. Raffle drawing also for a fun night out! Tacoma All Stars Sports Academy is a basketball team of young girls ages 8-12. Proceeds go toward facility rental for practice and league games fees. $10 Admission includes skate rental fee.

ED TAYLOR

Ed Taylor is an amazingly talented guitar and vocal artist with exceptional passion for music. He will be having an event on Oct. 18 at Urban Timber Coffee, 6621 166th Ave. E. in Sumner. This show will showcase songs from his latest album, “It’s Complicated,” and will also have special guests. The show is from 7:30-9:30 p.m. Learn more about Taylor at http://ift.tt/1wMUhhf. October 15, 2014 at 01:44PM

The Things We Like http://ift.tt/1xW33c8

EVELYN GLENNIE

Percussion superstar Dame Evelyn Glennie will take center stage with her vast array of instruments Oct. 25 when the Tacoma Symphony Orchestra opens its 2014-2015 performance season at Pantages Theater, 7:30 p.m. The new season opener will also mark the inaugural concert of new Music Director Sarah Ioannides, whose appointment was announced late last year on the heels of a two-year search encompassing a hundred international applicants. For tickets, $19 and up, visit http://ift.tt/QIElvB or call (253) 591-5894.

‘THE BOYS NEXT DOOR’

Pacific Lutheran University’s School of Arts and Communication and the Department of Communication & Theatre present “The Boys Next Door” by Tom Griffin, directed by Jeff CLapp. The production opens in Eastvold Auditorium of the Karen Hille Phillips Center for the Performing Arts on Oct. 17, 18, 24 and 25 at 7:30 p.m. and Oct. 26 at 2 p.m. This touching, funny play focuses on the lives of four disabled men in a communal residence where little things sometimes become momentous (and often funny), with are moments of great poignancy that remind us that the handicapped, like the rest of us, want only to love and laugh and find purpose in this world. Tickets can be purchased thought the Community Box Office on the first level of the Anderson University Center or call (253) 535-7411.

COSTUME CONCERT

Tacoma Youth Symphony celebrates the Halloween season with a “Costume Concert” on Saturday, Oct. 25, 7 p.m. at Urban Grace Church, 902 Market St. The young musicians will be dressed as characters from the movies, and the audience is invited to come in costume too. The concert will feature music from “The Fellowship of the Ring,” “Star Wars,” Disney’s “Frozen,” “The Lone Ranger,” “Close Encounters of the Third Kind” and “A Muppet Medley.” Tickets: $13, $19, and $46 for a family four-pack. Call (253) 627-2792 to purchase individual tickets or group packages for the 14-15 season.

HALLOWEEN SKATE

Join the girls from Tacoma All Stars Sports Academy, their friends and families for a fun night of spooky skating at Rollin 253 Skate and Community Center, 2101 Mildred St. W. in Fircrest, 6-8 p.m. Fun for the entire family. Costumes encouraged but not required – there will be a costume contest. Raffle drawing also for a fun night out! Tacoma All Stars Sports Academy is a basketball team of young girls ages 8-12. Proceeds go toward facility rental for practice and league games fees. $10 Admission includes skate rental fee.

ED TAYLOR

Ed Taylor is an amazingly talented guitar and vocal artist with exceptional passion for music. He will be having an event on Oct. 18 at Urban Timber Coffee, 6621 166th Ave. E. in Sumner. This show will showcase songs from his latest album, “It’s Complicated,” and will also have special guests. The show is from 7:30-9:30 p.m. Learn more about Taylor at http://ift.tt/1wMUhhf.

October 15, 2014 at 01:44PM

The Mind of Maltin http://ift.tt/1xW35AJ The Tacoma Film Festival went big in its ninth year. Not only did the Grand Cinema’s signature event feature higher profile films this month – edgy flicks starring the likes of Kirsten Dunst, Sam Rockwell and the late Philip Seymour Hoffman – but organizers also scored a major coup by landing high-profile speaker Leonard Maltin, among the most popular film critics and historians in America. 

Maltin – best known for reviewing films for “Entertainment Tonight” and his “Leonard Maltin Movie Guide” – made a couple of appearances at the festival on Oct. 10 and 11; and, in between, he met with Tacoma Weekly in the lobby of Hotel Murano to talk about being a smarter viewer, the toll blogging has taken on his craft and why you should quit paying for 3D. Here’s some of what he had to say. 

Tacoma Weekly: What is the first film you remember seeing? 

Maltin: The first film I have a memory of seeing is Walt Disney’s “Snow White and the Seven Dwarves,” when it was reissued in the ’50s. And, in those days … you could stay and watch a movie four times. They wouldn’t kick you out. The reason I bring that up is that what I remember is my mother taking me by the hand into the theater as everybody was leaving. So what I saw was … the last shot as Snow White and the Prince go off into the golden sun for their happy ending. That image is burned permanently into my memory and my psyche. 

TW: How old were you? 

Maltin: Either four or five. 

TW: In contrast, what are the films you most wish you could forget? 

Maltin: Fortunately, I’m forgetting them. (He laughs.) I’m at an age now where they’re starting to drop out of the memory banks. 

TW: You got started at a young age, and I’m curious what you think you would be doing if the whole critic/film historian thing didn’t work out.

Maltin: I wanted to be a cartoonist when I was very young – not an animator, but a cartoonist. I even submitted cartoons to several magazines and got rejection slips. But then I wrote to some of my heroes, and I got the most phenomenal, personal letter from Charles M. Schultz in which he was very encouraging and enclosed a signed, original “Peanuts” daily. 

TW: That’s pretty cool. 

Maltin: Then, about 30 years later, I got hired to interview him. … I told him that story. He jumped out of his seat and said, “Well, we gotta get something newer.” He went and found a Sunday original page and signed it to me and my wife, only this time he signed it “Sparky,” which was his nickname. 

TW: Is that still hanging in your living room?

Maltin: You bet, both of them – the old one and the newer one. 

TW: What advice would you give someone who is 14, 15 – like you were when you were first starting out – if they want to break into the business? 

Maltin: I’m glad I’m not trying to break in today. I don’t know how you make a reputation today, how you make yourself heard or noticed amid the clutter. Everything has changed. (Long pause.) What can you say to someone except, “If this is your passion, then you have to follow it?” And, of course, one still harbors hope that if you’re good somebody will notice. But there’s an awful lot of people out there writing, blogging and posting. It’s a very crowded landscape, and very few outlets are paying any money.

TW: I guess in pop culture when you were coming up there was a bit of a serendipitous moment, whether you were an aspiring rock star or …

Maltin: I guess, whether it was making your own garage tapes or publishing your own magazine, as I did. But the low-tech environment, in some ways, gave more opportunity – this seems counter-intuitive – to people who were ambitious and determined, because they stood out more. Now everybody’s just another blogger or just another YouTube wanna-be. 

TW: What’s the No. 1 thing you want to instill in your students at USC? 

Maltin: I want to make them a smarter audience, a more demanding audience. I don’t think Hollywood respects young moviegoers. There’s some cause for that, if they’re gonna go see movies like the new “Transformers” or the new “Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles.” But then moviegoers don’t get a choice, do they? 

I have a big class – 360 students – and only about a quarter of them are aspiring filmmakers or film critics or writers. We draw from the whole campus, so I have water polo players, English majors and business majors and everything else. … I’ve shown them foreign language films, with subtitles, and documentaries on subjects they’ve never thought about before, micro-indie features with no recognizable actors; and, if they’re good, they’ve responded. It says to me that they’re underestimated as an audience. 

TW: Along those lines, what are the most insufferable cliches you see in modern cinema. 

Maltin: Well, “sequel-itis” is very discouraging; and yet, this summer, the only films that did big business, apparently, were sequels. A good movie, like “Edge of Tomorrow” with Tom Cruise, got great reviews and did only modest business. So what message does that send to the studio chiefs? People want something they already know. People want more of the same. That’s dispiriting. And yet, you can’t have a sequel if you haven’t had an original. A sequel to what? Someone had to bank on that first movie before it became a series. 

TW: How do you feel about the whole 3D craze? 

Maltin: Well, the 3D craze is over. It’s only because they love it in China that they’re still doing it, and because they can bilk people out of an extra three bucks at the box office. 

TW: I’ve seen a few lately where I’ve thought, “Why did I spend that extra five bucks?”

Maltin: Well, duh. I mean, I’ll be curious to see what James Cameron does with the next “Avatar.” He’s a visionary – a technological visionary, to be sure. And when you see a film like “Life of Pi” in 3D you say, “OK, this is why 3D exists, for someone to make this kind of film” - or “Hugo.” But those are a tiny minority. A lot of the studios aren’t even bothering any more. 

TW: If we can veer back toward the impact of the Internet. Of course, nowadays versus 20 years ago, you can go to IMDB and any number of sources to find out anything you want to find out about a movie. Give me your best sales pitch for using a guide, like the one you’ve become known for (“Leonard Maltin’s Movie Guide.”) 

Maltin: Well, I’m highly prejudiced, so it’s hard to do that. I mean, I use IMDB, like everybody else. But it frustrates me because they don’t give you the cast in billing order. So if you (can’t find) a quick answer to “who plays the best friend in that comedy I saw last week?”

When “Nebraska” came out last year … who really knew June Squibb before that movie, right? Yet, she’s been working for decades. So what we did was we went back and added her name to the cast lists of films she’d been in. She was in Martin Scorsese’s “The Age of Innocence,” 21 years ago. Now, if you were having this conversation two years ago, that wouldn’t matter. It matters now. It’s a point of interest. But if you go to an online source, you’d never look for her name, and it would be way down among other supporting players. We point out that she’s in it: curated information, edited information, user friendly information. That’s what we’ve always tried to provide. And our readers have been loyal and supportive and encouraging. They’ve just diminished in number. 

TW: Until earlier this year you had the app. 

Maltin: I wish I still had the app. It was not my decision (to discontinue it.) The sales weren’t strong enough to support it. People, again, didn’t want to pay. People want to get all the information for free. They want it on their device, and they want it for free. Sometimes you have to remind people that you get what you pay for. 

TW: You get to see a lot of great films, but you also have to watch a lot of terrible ones, and you’re familiar with all the formulas and cliches. What is it that keeps you excited about film?

Maltin: A fresh idea, a new face, a new voice. I loved “Boyhood.” I loved “The Grand Budapest Hotel.” I really enjoyed “St. Vincent,” which opened yesterday, and “Whiplash,” which opened yesterday in New York and L.A. I see films like that, and it recharges my batteries and gives me a moment of optimism. 

TW: Well, since Halloween is coming up, what are your three go-to – or maybe underrated – horror films? 

Maltin: Well, I’m not a fan of modern horror. I like spooky, eerie films – ghost stories, the supernatural – more than graphic gore. I’m a wimp, so I couldn’t see the saw “Saw” movies. It’s just not my thing. But when I see a film like “28 Days Later” – which is not just a mindless zombie movie, it’s about a plague – it scares the daylights out of me. 

TW: I see you like the new “Dead Snow,” though I think you wrote you hadn’t seen the original - which is hilarious, by the way. 

Maltin: Normally, a film with tearing out somebody’s intestines would just send me running in the other direction. But it’s hilarious; and I do like the combination of humor and horror separate from that, going back to “Abbott and Costello Meet Frankenstein,” right up to “Young Frankenstein,” “Shawn of the Dead” – films like that. I’ve always enjoyed that mixture. 

I still like the gothic horror films THAT I grew up watching on TV. “Frankenstein,” “Dracula,” “Bride of Frankenstein,” “The Wolfman” - those are still favorites of mine. October 15, 2014 at 01:35PM

The Mind of Maltin http://ift.tt/1xW35AJ

The Tacoma Film Festival went big in its ninth year. Not only did the Grand Cinema’s signature event feature higher profile films this month – edgy flicks starring the likes of Kirsten Dunst, Sam Rockwell and the late Philip Seymour Hoffman – but organizers also scored a major coup by landing high-profile speaker Leonard Maltin, among the most popular film critics and historians in America.

Maltin – best known for reviewing films for “Entertainment Tonight” and his “Leonard Maltin Movie Guide” – made a couple of appearances at the festival on Oct. 10 and 11; and, in between, he met with Tacoma Weekly in the lobby of Hotel Murano to talk about being a smarter viewer, the toll blogging has taken on his craft and why you should quit paying for 3D. Here’s some of what he had to say.

Tacoma Weekly: What is the first film you remember seeing?

Maltin: The first film I have a memory of seeing is Walt Disney’s “Snow White and the Seven Dwarves,” when it was reissued in the ’50s. And, in those days … you could stay and watch a movie four times. They wouldn’t kick you out. The reason I bring that up is that what I remember is my mother taking me by the hand into the theater as everybody was leaving. So what I saw was … the last shot as Snow White and the Prince go off into the golden sun for their happy ending. That image is burned permanently into my memory and my psyche.

TW: How old were you?

Maltin: Either four or five.

TW: In contrast, what are the films you most wish you could forget?

Maltin: Fortunately, I’m forgetting them. (He laughs.) I’m at an age now where they’re starting to drop out of the memory banks.

TW: You got started at a young age, and I’m curious what you think you would be doing if the whole critic/film historian thing didn’t work out.

Maltin: I wanted to be a cartoonist when I was very young – not an animator, but a cartoonist. I even submitted cartoons to several magazines and got rejection slips. But then I wrote to some of my heroes, and I got the most phenomenal, personal letter from Charles M. Schultz in which he was very encouraging and enclosed a signed, original “Peanuts” daily.

TW: That’s pretty cool.

Maltin: Then, about 30 years later, I got hired to interview him. … I told him that story. He jumped out of his seat and said, “Well, we gotta get something newer.” He went and found a Sunday original page and signed it to me and my wife, only this time he signed it “Sparky,” which was his nickname.

TW: Is that still hanging in your living room?

Maltin: You bet, both of them – the old one and the newer one.

TW: What advice would you give someone who is 14, 15 – like you were when you were first starting out – if they want to break into the business?

Maltin: I’m glad I’m not trying to break in today. I don’t know how you make a reputation today, how you make yourself heard or noticed amid the clutter. Everything has changed. (Long pause.) What can you say to someone except, “If this is your passion, then you have to follow it?” And, of course, one still harbors hope that if you’re good somebody will notice. But there’s an awful lot of people out there writing, blogging and posting. It’s a very crowded landscape, and very few outlets are paying any money.

TW: I guess in pop culture when you were coming up there was a bit of a serendipitous moment, whether you were an aspiring rock star or …

Maltin: I guess, whether it was making your own garage tapes or publishing your own magazine, as I did. But the low-tech environment, in some ways, gave more opportunity – this seems counter-intuitive – to people who were ambitious and determined, because they stood out more. Now everybody’s just another blogger or just another YouTube wanna-be.

TW: What’s the No. 1 thing you want to instill in your students at USC?

Maltin: I want to make them a smarter audience, a more demanding audience. I don’t think Hollywood respects young moviegoers. There’s some cause for that, if they’re gonna go see movies like the new “Transformers” or the new “Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles.” But then moviegoers don’t get a choice, do they?

I have a big class – 360 students – and only about a quarter of them are aspiring filmmakers or film critics or writers. We draw from the whole campus, so I have water polo players, English majors and business majors and everything else. … I’ve shown them foreign language films, with subtitles, and documentaries on subjects they’ve never thought about before, micro-indie features with no recognizable actors; and, if they’re good, they’ve responded. It says to me that they’re underestimated as an audience.

TW: Along those lines, what are the most insufferable cliches you see in modern cinema.

Maltin: Well, “sequel-itis” is very discouraging; and yet, this summer, the only films that did big business, apparently, were sequels. A good movie, like “Edge of Tomorrow” with Tom Cruise, got great reviews and did only modest business. So what message does that send to the studio chiefs? People want something they already know. People want more of the same. That’s dispiriting. And yet, you can’t have a sequel if you haven’t had an original. A sequel to what? Someone had to bank on that first movie before it became a series.

TW: How do you feel about the whole 3D craze?

Maltin: Well, the 3D craze is over. It’s only because they love it in China that they’re still doing it, and because they can bilk people out of an extra three bucks at the box office.

TW: I’ve seen a few lately where I’ve thought, “Why did I spend that extra five bucks?”

Maltin: Well, duh. I mean, I’ll be curious to see what James Cameron does with the next “Avatar.” He’s a visionary – a technological visionary, to be sure. And when you see a film like “Life of Pi” in 3D you say, “OK, this is why 3D exists, for someone to make this kind of film” - or “Hugo.” But those are a tiny minority. A lot of the studios aren’t even bothering any more.

TW: If we can veer back toward the impact of the Internet. Of course, nowadays versus 20 years ago, you can go to IMDB and any number of sources to find out anything you want to find out about a movie. Give me your best sales pitch for using a guide, like the one you’ve become known for (“Leonard Maltin’s Movie Guide.”)

Maltin: Well, I’m highly prejudiced, so it’s hard to do that. I mean, I use IMDB, like everybody else. But it frustrates me because they don’t give you the cast in billing order. So if you (can’t find) a quick answer to “who plays the best friend in that comedy I saw last week?”

When “Nebraska” came out last year … who really knew June Squibb before that movie, right? Yet, she’s been working for decades. So what we did was we went back and added her name to the cast lists of films she’d been in. She was in Martin Scorsese’s “The Age of Innocence,” 21 years ago. Now, if you were having this conversation two years ago, that wouldn’t matter. It matters now. It’s a point of interest. But if you go to an online source, you’d never look for her name, and it would be way down among other supporting players. We point out that she’s in it: curated information, edited information, user friendly information. That’s what we’ve always tried to provide. And our readers have been loyal and supportive and encouraging. They’ve just diminished in number.

TW: Until earlier this year you had the app.

Maltin: I wish I still had the app. It was not my decision (to discontinue it.) The sales weren’t strong enough to support it. People, again, didn’t want to pay. People want to get all the information for free. They want it on their device, and they want it for free. Sometimes you have to remind people that you get what you pay for.

TW: You get to see a lot of great films, but you also have to watch a lot of terrible ones, and you’re familiar with all the formulas and cliches. What is it that keeps you excited about film?

Maltin: A fresh idea, a new face, a new voice. I loved “Boyhood.” I loved “The Grand Budapest Hotel.” I really enjoyed “St. Vincent,” which opened yesterday, and “Whiplash,” which opened yesterday in New York and L.A. I see films like that, and it recharges my batteries and gives me a moment of optimism.

TW: Well, since Halloween is coming up, what are your three go-to – or maybe underrated – horror films?

Maltin: Well, I’m not a fan of modern horror. I like spooky, eerie films – ghost stories, the supernatural – more than graphic gore. I’m a wimp, so I couldn’t see the saw “Saw” movies. It’s just not my thing. But when I see a film like “28 Days Later” – which is not just a mindless zombie movie, it’s about a plague – it scares the daylights out of me.

TW: I see you like the new “Dead Snow,” though I think you wrote you hadn’t seen the original - which is hilarious, by the way.

Maltin: Normally, a film with tearing out somebody’s intestines would just send me running in the other direction. But it’s hilarious; and I do like the combination of humor and horror separate from that, going back to “Abbott and Costello Meet Frankenstein,” right up to “Young Frankenstein,” “Shawn of the Dead” – films like that. I’ve always enjoyed that mixture.

I still like the gothic horror films THAT I grew up watching on TV. “Frankenstein,” “Dracula,” “Bride of Frankenstein,” “The Wolfman” - those are still favorites of mine.

October 15, 2014 at 01:35PM

Restaurant Spotlight: Dowd’s BBQ http://ift.tt/1xW32oL If you’re a local Tacoman looking for a taste of the south, try Dowd’s BBQ, located at 10505 S. Steele St., an authentic southern style barbeque restaurant influenced by recipes from North Carolina, Tennessee, Texas and Louisiana.

“What makes us unique is the time that we spend to make sure everything is authentic, old southern recipe. We really take our time to do it right. We’re not copying anyone out here, we’re doing it the old-fashioned way,” owner Martin Dowd said.

Dowd’s mother, Joyce Davis, developed the original recipes but it was Dowd himself who brought the recipes with southern sensibility to the restaurant.

The Pork Rib Catfish combo dinner for $14.95 comes with three rib prongs and a whole fillet as well as two sides and cornbread. Or try the four way combo that comes with rib bone, hot wings, a piece of barbequed chicken, a slice of brisket, baked beans and potato salad for $8.95.

With all these great recipes in hand, there was no doubt to Dowd where he should open up shop. “Tacoma likes to show their appreciation for good food. Other places you go, the customers are in and out but once you serve a Tacoman, they’re with you,” Dowd said.

Dowd also makes sure to give back to the community that breathes life into his business, partnering with Planting Seeds to deliver turkeys to families in need over the holidays.

This year Dowd is further getting into the holiday spirit by offering Thanksgiving meals for those who want a traditional meal but may not have the time or skills to prepare a classic dinner. The meal will include a 15-pound turkey or ham with three sides and a sweet potato pie for $80.

Dowd’s BBQ also offers catering for special events. Visit www.dowdsbbq.com for a quote or call (253) 830-2086 for more information. October 15, 2014 at 12:08PM

Restaurant Spotlight: Dowd’s BBQ http://ift.tt/1xW32oL

If you’re a local Tacoman looking for a taste of the south, try Dowd’s BBQ, located at 10505 S. Steele St., an authentic southern style barbeque restaurant influenced by recipes from North Carolina, Tennessee, Texas and Louisiana.

“What makes us unique is the time that we spend to make sure everything is authentic, old southern recipe. We really take our time to do it right. We’re not copying anyone out here, we’re doing it the old-fashioned way,” owner Martin Dowd said.

Dowd’s mother, Joyce Davis, developed the original recipes but it was Dowd himself who brought the recipes with southern sensibility to the restaurant.

The Pork Rib Catfish combo dinner for $14.95 comes with three rib prongs and a whole fillet as well as two sides and cornbread. Or try the four way combo that comes with rib bone, hot wings, a piece of barbequed chicken, a slice of brisket, baked beans and potato salad for $8.95.

With all these great recipes in hand, there was no doubt to Dowd where he should open up shop. “Tacoma likes to show their appreciation for good food. Other places you go, the customers are in and out but once you serve a Tacoman, they’re with you,” Dowd said.

Dowd also makes sure to give back to the community that breathes life into his business, partnering with Planting Seeds to deliver turkeys to families in need over the holidays.

This year Dowd is further getting into the holiday spirit by offering Thanksgiving meals for those who want a traditional meal but may not have the time or skills to prepare a classic dinner. The meal will include a 15-pound turkey or ham with three sides and a sweet potato pie for $80.

Dowd’s BBQ also offers catering for special events. Visit www.dowdsbbq.com for a quote or call (253) 830-2086 for more information.

October 15, 2014 at 12:08PM

Bellarmine remains class of the Narrows with Oly beatdown http://ift.tt/11vUJ8t The Bellarmine Lady Lions volleyball team took another step toward capturing another 4A Narrows league title Tuesday, Oct. 14, as they made quick work of a quality Olympia club that ultimately was no match for the two-time defending state champions. Bellarmine rolled-up a three game sweep of the bears by scores of 25-8, 25-13 and 25-10. 

A league title is always a fantastic goal and achievement, but don’t be mistaken – the second-ranked Lady Lions are on a quest for a third state title and they have no problem letting that be known. When you’re the reigning champ, all teams are gunning for you. So far, Bellarmine (9-0 Narrows, 11-0 overall) has been nearly flawless and seems to be getting better as the season barrels toward the playoffs.

The three games were a showcase of the almost point guard-like abilities of senior Natalie Jensen as she set-up her teammates for kill shots throughout the contest and dished-up point-after-point from the service line.

In the first game, Bellarmine traded points with the Bears (5-3, 6-4) as both teams worked to get into a flow of the game. At 3-3 the Lady Lions began asserting itself as freshman Hannah Pukis took over serve and ran the score to 7-3 after a couple of aces and two kills by her sister, senior Reghan Pukis. Soon, Bellarmine ran together another four-point run with sophomore Mckenzie Schwan holding serve and the lead grew to 12-4.

The Bears put together a couple of points and then senior Madeline Lilley took over service with a 13-6 lead. Before she relinquished serve, the Lady Lions put together a seven-point run powered by three Lilley aces and strong net-play from Reghan Pukis and senior Claire Martin. At 21-7, Jensen took over serve and the net domination continued as the lead advanced to 24-7. A net violation gave the Bears a point and then Reghan Pukis hammered down a spike that hit nothing but hardwood and the Lady Lions took game one.

In game two, the Bears dug in and put up a stronger fight closing to within 10-8 in the early goings. Sophomore Claire McCarthy took over serve at 11-8 and built it up to 15-8 before giving it back to Olympia. The sequence was highlighted by a fantastic dig by Hannah Pukis, which then turned into a perfect set from Jensen and finished by a massive kill shot from Reghan Pukis.

Bellarmine outscored Olympia 10-5 to end game two as Hannah Pukis delivered a spike that careened off a Bear and went into the stands. It was clear that the Lady Lions were in complete control of the match and were suffering the few points from the Bears off of many of their own miscues – and there weren’t that many.

Game three was all Bellarmine early as they jumped out to a 6-2 lead, which included four textbook sets from Jensen. The Bears showed some grit and closed to within 9-6, but as the previous games showed, they were unable to make any sort of run and string a series of points together.

At 10-6, Schwan took over service and Olympia repeatedly had difficulty getting her serves back over the net. The nine-point run pushed the Lady Lion lead to 19-6. Olympia bounced back with its first three-point run of the night pushing the score to 19-9 before another Reghan Pukis kill put the serve back to Bellarmine. At game point, Jensen fed Reghan Pukis with another perfect set and the senior slammed the ball to the gymnasium floor on the Bears’ side of the net and the match was over.

Bellarmine returns home for Senior Night against Stadium on Thursday, Oct. 23. First serve is at 4:45 p.m. October 15, 2014 at 10:39AM

Bellarmine remains class of the Narrows with Oly beatdown http://ift.tt/11vUJ8t

The Bellarmine Lady Lions volleyball team took another step toward capturing another 4A Narrows league title Tuesday, Oct. 14, as they made quick work of a quality Olympia club that ultimately was no match for the two-time defending state champions. Bellarmine rolled-up a three game sweep of the bears by scores of 25-8, 25-13 and 25-10. 

A league title is always a fantastic goal and achievement, but don’t be mistaken – the second-ranked Lady Lions are on a quest for a third state title and they have no problem letting that be known. When you’re the reigning champ, all teams are gunning for you. So far, Bellarmine (9-0 Narrows, 11-0 overall) has been nearly flawless and seems to be getting better as the season barrels toward the playoffs.

The three games were a showcase of the almost point guard-like abilities of senior Natalie Jensen as she set-up her teammates for kill shots throughout the contest and dished-up point-after-point from the service line.

In the first game, Bellarmine traded points with the Bears (5-3, 6-4) as both teams worked to get into a flow of the game. At 3-3 the Lady Lions began asserting itself as freshman Hannah Pukis took over serve and ran the score to 7-3 after a couple of aces and two kills by her sister, senior Reghan Pukis. Soon, Bellarmine ran together another four-point run with sophomore Mckenzie Schwan holding serve and the lead grew to 12-4.

The Bears put together a couple of points and then senior Madeline Lilley took over service with a 13-6 lead. Before she relinquished serve, the Lady Lions put together a seven-point run powered by three Lilley aces and strong net-play from Reghan Pukis and senior Claire Martin. At 21-7, Jensen took over serve and the net domination continued as the lead advanced to 24-7. A net violation gave the Bears a point and then Reghan Pukis hammered down a spike that hit nothing but hardwood and the Lady Lions took game one.

In game two, the Bears dug in and put up a stronger fight closing to within 10-8 in the early goings. Sophomore Claire McCarthy took over serve at 11-8 and built it up to 15-8 before giving it back to Olympia. The sequence was highlighted by a fantastic dig by Hannah Pukis, which then turned into a perfect set from Jensen and finished by a massive kill shot from Reghan Pukis.

Bellarmine outscored Olympia 10-5 to end game two as Hannah Pukis delivered a spike that careened off a Bear and went into the stands. It was clear that the Lady Lions were in complete control of the match and were suffering the few points from the Bears off of many of their own miscues – and there weren’t that many.

Game three was all Bellarmine early as they jumped out to a 6-2 lead, which included four textbook sets from Jensen. The Bears showed some grit and closed to within 9-6, but as the previous games showed, they were unable to make any sort of run and string a series of points together.

At 10-6, Schwan took over service and Olympia repeatedly had difficulty getting her serves back over the net. The nine-point run pushed the Lady Lion lead to 19-6. Olympia bounced back with its first three-point run of the night pushing the score to 19-9 before another Reghan Pukis kill put the serve back to Bellarmine. At game point, Jensen fed Reghan Pukis with another perfect set and the senior slammed the ball to the gymnasium floor on the Bears’ side of the net and the match was over.

Bellarmine returns home for Senior Night against Stadium on Thursday, Oct. 23. First serve is at 4:45 p.m.

October 15, 2014 at 10:39AM

Capital knocks Wilson from ranks of unbeaten http://ift.tt/1xW2ZJr Wilson ran into a surprisingly stout and powerful football team in the Capital Cougars on Friday, Oct. 10 at Stadium Bowl and suffered a 34-21 defeat in 3A Narrows league action. The loss knocked the Rams out of a tie for first place and will make the road back to a repeat playoff appearance a little more difficult.

The Rams (3-1 Narrows, 5-1 overall) came out strong against the Cougars (3-1, 4-2) following the opening kickoff. Starting from its own 20-yard line, Wilson put together a nine-play, 80-yard drive capped by a spinning quarterback sneak by senior signal-caller Julius Yates-Brown. Sophomore Alek Greenleaf punched the point-after kick through and the Rams took an early 7-0 lead with 8:34 remaining in the first quarter.

On the next play from scrimmage, Capital’s Ryan Rieta fumbled the ball after a big hit from Wilson senior linebacker David Shin and the Rams took over at the Cougar 25-yard line. It would be a short-lived celebration though as the Rams gave the ball back on the next play when Yates-Brown was intercepted in the end zone by Capital’s Danny Leatherwood.

The missed opportunity would come back to haunt the Rams.

Capital responded with its own eight-play, 80-yard drive finished-off by a 19-yard touchdown pass from Cody Jenkins to Sean Morris. After a successful point-after kick, the score was tied-up at 7-7 with 4:04 remaining in the first quarter.

Wilson was forced to punt on the next possession after a three-and-out and Capital took over at its own 18-yard line. The Cougars strung together seven-straight running plays capped by a seven-yard keeper by Jenkins up the middle and with 10:31 left in the half, the Cougars now led 13-7 following an unsuccessful two-point conversion attempt.

On the next possession, the Rams twice tried to make more out of a play than what was there and they were forced to punt again after losing four yards in the series. Capital would make the most of its field-position at the 50-yard line and five plays later running back Conner Kennedy punched the ball in from the two-yard line. Rieta added a two-point conversion run and the Cougars led 21-7 with 6:49 remaining in the half.

The Rams were able to move the ball out to their own 43-yard line on the next series, but two quarterback sacks of Yates-Brown forced Wilson to punt again. Wilson dialed-up the defensive pressure on the next possession and forced Capital to punt after three plays. The Cougars attempted a fake punt and the Rams sniffed it out and got the ball back at the Cougar 41-yard line.

After a 10-yard run by senior running back Zavia Frazier it looked like Wilson was going to get back in the ballgame. On the next play, Yates-Brown scrambled for a dazzling 31-yard touchdown run that whipped the Ram faithful into a frenzy. However, there were yellow flags back near the line of scrimmage and the touchdown was wiped away by a holding penalty. Wilson was unable to rebound and ended-up turning the ball over on downs after falling one yard short of a first down shortly before the half ended.

Capital received the opening kickoff and brought the ball out to its own 39-yard line. After crossing mid-field, the Rams defense firmed-up and forced the Cougars to punt. The ball was downed at the six-yard line and the Rams were unable to respond with any yardage in three plays. Greenleaf’s punt pushed Capital back to the Wilson 43-yard line and trouble was in the air.

On the second play of the possession, Capital’s Kennedy busted through the left side of the line, weaved back to the right side of the field and dove into the end zone with Wilson defenders draped across his back. After the 40-yard touchdown and point-after kick, the Cougars now led 28-7 with 6:05 remaining in the third quarter.

Wilson struck fool’s gold and then pay dirt on their next possession as Yates-Brown changed direction in the backfield and bolted up the sideline for a 68-yard touchdown run that was called back for a block in the back. The penalty backed the Rams up to their own 43-yard line and then they went to work. Capitalizing on a 32-yard pass from Yates-Brown to senior receiver Keun Thompson, the Rams worked the ball down to the Capital four-yard line. Yates-Brown went with another keeper and dove toward the end zone, just getting the ball across the goal line for a Wilson touchdown. Capital’s lead was now 28-14 with 23-seconds remaining in the third quarter.

The Rams stuffed the Cougars on the next possession and took following a huge punt and roll by Capital, took over at their own five-yard line. It was Yates-Brown and Frazier all the way down the field as the Rams put together a seven-play, 95-yard touchdown drive capped by a ten-yard camper by Frazier. Capital’s lead was down to 28-21 with 8:22 left in the game.

Capital ran off over four minutes of the clock on its next possession and put together a 58-yard scoring drive finished-off by a five-yard Kennedy touchdown run. The Cougars faked the point-after kick but Jenkins was gobbled up by senior Billy Greer and Shin for the stop. Capital now led 34-21 with 4:08 remaining in the game.

Frazier returned the Capital kickoff 56 yards to the Capital 43-yard line. Wilson was threatening to tighten-up the game. On the first play from scrimmage, Yates-Brown lofted a deep pass to the end zone that was intercepted by Capital’s Carson Bertelli. Capital took over at its own 20-yard line and successfully ran out the clock to end the end the game.

Wilson visits the Foss Falcons (2-2, 2-4) at Mt. Tahoma Stadium on Friday, Oct. 17. Kickoff is set for 7 p.m.

TACOMA AREA FOOTBALL SCORES FOR OCT. 10

BELLARMINE PREP 35, SOUTH KITSAP 10

LINCOLN 69, NORTH THURSTON 27

FOSS 29, MT. TAHOMA 20

OLYMPIA 34, STADIUM 6

FRANKLIN PIERCE 38, FIFE 35

RIVER RIDGE 53, WASHINGTON 8

WHITE RIVER 40, CLOVER PARK 8

AUBURN MOUNTAINVIEW 17, LAKES 0

CURTIS 50, ROGERS 14

CHARLES WRIGHT 58, VASHON 22

NORTH BEACH 75, CHIEF LESCHI 0

RAINIER 48, TACOMA BAPTIST 0 October 15, 2014 at 10:32AM

Capital knocks Wilson from ranks of unbeaten http://ift.tt/1xW2ZJr

Wilson ran into a surprisingly stout and powerful football team in the Capital Cougars on Friday, Oct. 10 at Stadium Bowl and suffered a 34-21 defeat in 3A Narrows league action. The loss knocked the Rams out of a tie for first place and will make the road back to a repeat playoff appearance a little more difficult.

The Rams (3-1 Narrows, 5-1 overall) came out strong against the Cougars (3-1, 4-2) following the opening kickoff. Starting from its own 20-yard line, Wilson put together a nine-play, 80-yard drive capped by a spinning quarterback sneak by senior signal-caller Julius Yates-Brown. Sophomore Alek Greenleaf punched the point-after kick through and the Rams took an early 7-0 lead with 8:34 remaining in the first quarter.

On the next play from scrimmage, Capital’s Ryan Rieta fumbled the ball after a big hit from Wilson senior linebacker David Shin and the Rams took over at the Cougar 25-yard line. It would be a short-lived celebration though as the Rams gave the ball back on the next play when Yates-Brown was intercepted in the end zone by Capital’s Danny Leatherwood.

The missed opportunity would come back to haunt the Rams.

Capital responded with its own eight-play, 80-yard drive finished-off by a 19-yard touchdown pass from Cody Jenkins to Sean Morris. After a successful point-after kick, the score was tied-up at 7-7 with 4:04 remaining in the first quarter.

Wilson was forced to punt on the next possession after a three-and-out and Capital took over at its own 18-yard line. The Cougars strung together seven-straight running plays capped by a seven-yard keeper by Jenkins up the middle and with 10:31 left in the half, the Cougars now led 13-7 following an unsuccessful two-point conversion attempt.

On the next possession, the Rams twice tried to make more out of a play than what was there and they were forced to punt again after losing four yards in the series. Capital would make the most of its field-position at the 50-yard line and five plays later running back Conner Kennedy punched the ball in from the two-yard line. Rieta added a two-point conversion run and the Cougars led 21-7 with 6:49 remaining in the half.

The Rams were able to move the ball out to their own 43-yard line on the next series, but two quarterback sacks of Yates-Brown forced Wilson to punt again. Wilson dialed-up the defensive pressure on the next possession and forced Capital to punt after three plays. The Cougars attempted a fake punt and the Rams sniffed it out and got the ball back at the Cougar 41-yard line.

After a 10-yard run by senior running back Zavia Frazier it looked like Wilson was going to get back in the ballgame. On the next play, Yates-Brown scrambled for a dazzling 31-yard touchdown run that whipped the Ram faithful into a frenzy. However, there were yellow flags back near the line of scrimmage and the touchdown was wiped away by a holding penalty. Wilson was unable to rebound and ended-up turning the ball over on downs after falling one yard short of a first down shortly before the half ended.

Capital received the opening kickoff and brought the ball out to its own 39-yard line. After crossing mid-field, the Rams defense firmed-up and forced the Cougars to punt. The ball was downed at the six-yard line and the Rams were unable to respond with any yardage in three plays. Greenleaf’s punt pushed Capital back to the Wilson 43-yard line and trouble was in the air.

On the second play of the possession, Capital’s Kennedy busted through the left side of the line, weaved back to the right side of the field and dove into the end zone with Wilson defenders draped across his back. After the 40-yard touchdown and point-after kick, the Cougars now led 28-7 with 6:05 remaining in the third quarter.

Wilson struck fool’s gold and then pay dirt on their next possession as Yates-Brown changed direction in the backfield and bolted up the sideline for a 68-yard touchdown run that was called back for a block in the back. The penalty backed the Rams up to their own 43-yard line and then they went to work. Capitalizing on a 32-yard pass from Yates-Brown to senior receiver Keun Thompson, the Rams worked the ball down to the Capital four-yard line. Yates-Brown went with another keeper and dove toward the end zone, just getting the ball across the goal line for a Wilson touchdown. Capital’s lead was now 28-14 with 23-seconds remaining in the third quarter.

The Rams stuffed the Cougars on the next possession and took following a huge punt and roll by Capital, took over at their own five-yard line. It was Yates-Brown and Frazier all the way down the field as the Rams put together a seven-play, 95-yard touchdown drive capped by a ten-yard camper by Frazier. Capital’s lead was down to 28-21 with 8:22 left in the game.

Capital ran off over four minutes of the clock on its next possession and put together a 58-yard scoring drive finished-off by a five-yard Kennedy touchdown run. The Cougars faked the point-after kick but Jenkins was gobbled up by senior Billy Greer and Shin for the stop. Capital now led 34-21 with 4:08 remaining in the game.

Frazier returned the Capital kickoff 56 yards to the Capital 43-yard line. Wilson was threatening to tighten-up the game. On the first play from scrimmage, Yates-Brown lofted a deep pass to the end zone that was intercepted by Capital’s Carson Bertelli. Capital took over at its own 20-yard line and successfully ran out the clock to end the end the game.

Wilson visits the Foss Falcons (2-2, 2-4) at Mt. Tahoma Stadium on Friday, Oct. 17. Kickoff is set for 7 p.m.

TACOMA AREA FOOTBALL SCORES FOR OCT. 10

BELLARMINE PREP 35, SOUTH KITSAP 10

LINCOLN 69, NORTH THURSTON 27

FOSS 29, MT. TAHOMA 20

OLYMPIA 34, STADIUM 6

FRANKLIN PIERCE 38, FIFE 35

RIVER RIDGE 53, WASHINGTON 8

WHITE RIVER 40, CLOVER PARK 8

AUBURN MOUNTAINVIEW 17, LAKES 0

CURTIS 50, ROGERS 14

CHARLES WRIGHT 58, VASHON 22

NORTH BEACH 75, CHIEF LESCHI 0

RAINIER 48, TACOMA BAPTIST 0

October 15, 2014 at 10:32AM